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Folks,

Transmitter Servicing Course 503/4, 1945, is a training manual that focuses on WW II naval transmitters TAJ, TBK, TBL, TDE and TBS.

Thank you Rob Flory for providing a scan of the manual.

In this online version of the manual we have attempted to keep the flavor of the original layout while taking advantage of the Web's universal accessibility. Different browsers and fonts will cause the text to move, but the text will remain roughly where it is in the original manual. In addition to errors we have attempted to preserve from the original, this text was captured by a combination of optical character recognition and human typist. Each method creates errors that are compounded while encoding for the Web.Please report any typos, or particularly annoying layout issues with the Mail Feedback Form for correction.

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Cover art:
RESTRICTED
TRANSMITTER SERVICING
COURSE 503/4
NAVAL TRAINING SCHOOL

 

A sheet of handwritten notes:
Notes on TBs
1. K101 is energized all except on MCW
Contacts open when energized
2. K102 energized only MCW
3. K101 and K102 never energized at same time
4. K104 and K108 contacts B+ to all stage except audio osc
5. K104 must be energized to energize K103

 

RESTRICTED

TRANSMITTER SERVICING
COURSE 503/4

NAVAL TRAINING SCHOOL
(RADIO MATERIAL)

TREASURE ISLAND
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

MAY 1945

 

1
 

COURSE 503114

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

The transmitters covered in this book are communication type, for transmitting CW, MCW and PHONE signals.

INSTRUCTION BOOKS

1. PURPOSE: To provide information for installing, operating, maintaining and servicing specific equipment.

2. GENERAL CONTENTS:

(a) Safety precautions.
(b) Introduction to equipment.
(c) Manufacturers' guarantee.
(d) Description of equipment.
(e) Installation.
(f) Operation.
(g) Maintenance.
(h) List of major units.
(i) Spare parts list.
(j) Diagrams and illustrations.

3. WHERE TO OBTAIN: Two instruction books should accompany each equipment. If not packed with the equipment, the books may be mailed to the Commanding Officer. Ask for them through the Communications or Security Officer.

4. USE OF INSTRUCTION BOOKS:

(a) As study material from which the technician can make his own servicing block and simplified schematic diagrams.
(b) As a guide in setting up a regular maintenance schedule.
(c) As a reference during installation and servicing.

5. TYPICAL TEST DATA: Usually two copies of typical test data are furnished with each set of instruction books- This data is compiled from extensive performance tests and measurements taken at the factory, and is a reliable guide to normal operation of the equipment. Typical test data includes:

(a) Frequency tests.
(b) Control circuit tests.
(c) Power output tests,
(d) Emission tests.
(e) Vibration and shock tests.
(f) Voltage and current measurements.

As many as possible of these tests should be duplicated with the ship's own test equipment after the installation is complete and is working properly. A permanent record of such tests should be kept in the equipment log.

 

2
 

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

RADIO EQUIPMENT LOG BOOK

1. PURPOSE: The new log furnished by the Bureau of Ships is a permanently bound book of 335 pages, designed to record a complete history of all equipment in an average radio room for two years. The log book replaces the Communication Equipment Index and Communication Equipment History card files.

Fig. 1 Front Cover and Contents of Radio Equipment Log Book.
Fig. 1 Front Cover and Contents of Radio Equipment Log Book.

2. WHERE TO OBTAIN: The log book has been distributed to all ships and stations on the basis of one for each radio space. More copies may be obtained from Radio Materiel Officers or from the Bureau of Ships.

3. USE: The blank forms in the log book are designed to cover all routine inspections and tests required by Chapter 67 of the Bureau of Ships Manual (formerly Chapter 31 of the Manual of Engineering Instructions). Special inspections and tests required by individual equipments, outlined in the manufacturers' instruction books, should be added to the log. Official modifications and improvements announced in al Ships Communication Equipment Maintenance Bulletins (CEMB) are to be made and logged without further notification.

A Sonar Equipment Log book has been issued, and a Radar Equipment Log book will be issued for similar use with Sonar and Radar equipment. The counterparts of the Communication Equipment Maintenance Bulletins (CEMB) are: Sonar Maintenance Bulletins (SMB) and Radar Maintenance Bulletins (RMB).

 

3
 

RECORDS AND REPORTS

CALIBRATION CHARTS: A calibration chart similar to the one in Fig. 2 is mounted on the front panel of each transmitter to provide, for immediate reference, all tuning dial settings for several of the most important frequencies used. Additional charts are included in the Radio Equipment Log Book for recording dial settings of many more frequencies. The original dial settings are Obtained by first tuning the transmitter very carefully to each desired frequency. Repeat settings then may be made from the charted readings without checking with a frequency meter and instruction book tuning curves. Charted readings should be checked and corrected where necessary after any replacement of tubes or parts, any severe shock, changes in antenna characteristics, etc.

Fig. 2 Typical Calibration Chart for front panel of transmitter.
Fig. 2 Typical Calibration Chart for front panel of transmitter.

VACUUM TUBE SERVICE RECORDS: A vacuum tube service record such as the one shown in Fig. 3 must be kept for at least each Service Life Guaranteed tube, each special Radar tube, and each transmitting tube of the class of types 849, 851, 861 and larger. These cards then provide the necessary information for filling out the official report of vacuum tube failure on the new FAILURE REPORT - ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, revised 3-45, shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 3 Sample Vacuum Tube Service Record Card.
Fig. 3 Sample Vacuum Tube Service Record Card.

 

4
 

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

Front, as used for reporting vacuum tube failures. FAILURE REPORT-ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT
Back, containing complete instructions. REMARKS (Continued)
1. This form supersedes previous versions of Navy Forms NBS 304 and 383. Previous instructions pertaining to the preparation and submission of these report forms are being amended to contours to current procedures.

2. This simplified report form shall be used to report immediately all failures (whatever the cause) of electronic equipment parts, (tubes and components) to Bureau of Ships, Code 980, Washington 25, D. C. No copes are required, fill in with TYPEWRITER, PEN, or PENCIL.

3. The purposs of this report is to indicate the cause and rate of failures; it will form the basis for improvements in desig, and for contractual adjustment, should the latter action be in ordor. Adjustments of controctual matters will be made between authorized representatives of the Bureau and the contractor.

4. If CONFIDENTIAL information is included in this report, mail in accordance with SECURITY REGULATIONS. TYPE and MODEL DESIGNATIONS are NOT confidential.

5. This report is NOT a requisition; replacements must be ordered from your Tender, Supply Depot, Supply Officer, or Radio Material Officer.

6. Select appropriate NUMBER from table below to describe TYPE OF FAILURE. (This procedure will permit failure analysis by IB machines.)

(1) Broken by physical cause, e.g. shell hit, dropped.
(2) Failed due to shock, e.g. electrical failure or mechanical failure dure to shell explosion or to gunfire shock.
(3) Internal electrical failure, e.g. low output, poor focus, open filament, noisy.
(4) Failure due to overload, e.g. short due to failed resistor, capacitor, or other similar component.

7. The contract number and number of hours guaranteed are stamped on the body or base of guaranteed tubes. The date of acceptance by the Government inspector can be obtained from the carton, when it does not appear on a form accompanying the tube, and should be reported if available. Nonguaranteed tubes are not marked as above; hence this data need not be supplied.

8. DISPOSITION OF MATERIAL.-All components or tubes failing should be disposed of in accordance with existing Salvage and Security Regulations. (No Items need be retained for official survey, deposition instructions or return to supplier.) In the case of excessive failures of any particular item, special action will be taken by the Bureau for collection and return of samples for examination.
US Governement Printing Office 16-43921-1
Front, as used for reporting parts failures. FAILURE REPORT-ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT

Fig. 4 Sample FAILURE REPORT - ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT, Navships (NBS) 383 (REV. 3-45).

 

5
 

MOTOR-GENERATOR SERVICING

1. MOTOR-GENERATOR CARE:

(a) Never clean commutators or work on a machine while it is running.

(b) Use only fine sandpaper to smooth commutators; never use emery cloth or other conducting. abrasives.

(c) Keep both the interior and exterior of Machines, panels and control boxes clean.

(d) Keep all electrical connections tight.

(e) Inspect machines during each watch. If any unit is not operating properly it should be shut down and the defect remedied.

(f) Keep protective devices such as circuit breakers, fuses and inter-locks in working order and operating at their proper settings. .

(g) After an overhaul, never start a machine until a careful inspection has been made for loose bolts, tools, broken insulation, metallic dust or chips, improper clearance, loose or improper connections, and lubrication.

(h) When a motor or generator bearing overheats, flush it with new lubricant and cool it before the machine is stopped, to avoid freezing the bearing to the journal.

2. VISUAL INSPECTIONS: Many defects can be discovered quickly without making extensive tests or electrical measurements.

3. TESTING FOR LEAKY INSULATION AND GROUNDED COILS:

(a) Remove brushes and other connections from field coil leads to avoid parallel circuits in testing.

(b) Make insulation tests as shown in Fig. 5, using a megger or a high range Ohmmeter.

(c) Normal reading should be several megohms.

(d) Absorbed moisture may cause the insulation resistance to be as low as one megohm. Dry thoroughly by plow heating or baking.

(e) A reading of less than one megohm indicates defective insulation. Isolate the defective coil or commutator bar by testing each one individually.

Fig. 5 Testing for leaky insulation and grounded coils.
Fig. 5 Testing for leaky insulation and grounded coils.

 

6
 

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

4. ARMATURE AND FIELD COIL FAILURES:

(a) Mechanical defects may be worn bearings, loose or sagged windings, exposed mica segments or otherwise rough, uneven commutators.

(b) Electrical defects may be open coils or connections, shorted coils, or grounded coils.

5. TESTING FOR OPEN OR SHORTED FIELD COILS:

(a) Remove brushes and other connections from field coil leads to avoid parallel circuits in testing.

(b) Test with an ohmmeter as shown in Fig. 6.

(c) No continuity indicates an open coil. Isolate the defective coil by testing each coil individually.

(d) Continuity, even with approximately correct resistance, for all coils in series does not eliminate the possibility of a shorted coil. Test each coil individually. One reading appreciably less than the others indicates a shorted or partially shorted coil. Visual inspection usually reveals signs of overheating.

(e) Spare field coils are often supplied With the equipment, and may be installed by the technician without special tools.

Fig. 6 Testing for open or shorted field coils.
Fig. 6 Testing for open or shorted field coils.

 

7
 

MOTOR-GENERATOR SERVICING

6. TESTING FOR OPEN OR SHORTED ARMATURE COILS:

(a) Lift all but one set of brushes free of the commutator.

(b) Apply DC through a current limiting lamp as shown in Fig. 7. The test current divides into two parallel paths, one through coils A, B and C; the other through coils E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L and M (coil D in Fig. 7 is shorted by the negative brush).

(c) The test meter should be a milliammeter with a range appropriate for the test current.

(d) All bar to bar measurements between adjacent commutator bars in the current path including coils E to M should give practically identical readings. To obtain similar readings on coils A to D, rotate the armature to bring these coils into the same current path.

(1) An open coil causes a high reading across that coil, but zero across all others in the same current path

(2) A short in a coil or between commutator bars causes a low or zero reading across the defect, and slightly higher than normal readings across all other test points in the same current path.

(e) If the resistance of individual armature coils is high enough to give satisfactory readings on an ohmmeter, similar bar to bar measurements may be made without an external source of DC

(f) Armature repairs are difficult to make, and should be done by a repair ship or Navy yard shop if possible.

Fig. 7 Testing for open or shorted armature coils.
Fig. 7 Testing for open or shorted armature coils.

 

8
 

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

Fig. 8 A typical shipboard installation of communication transmitting equipment.
Fig. 8 A typical shipboard installation of communication transmitting equipment.

 

9
 

A TYPICAL SHIPBOARD INSTALLATION
OF COMMUNICATION TRANSMITTING EQUIPMENT

The installation described here is based on that of a large destroyer. The details of individual installations vary widely, especially in older ships where electronic equipment has outgrown the original construction plans. Therefore the following typical arrangement applies only in general.

  MAIN
RADIO ROOM
EMERGENCY
RADIO ROOM
CIC PILOT HOUSE
TRANSMITTERS TAJ
TBK
TBS
TDQ
TBL with
modulator
and speech
input eq.
TCS
MN
MAN
RECEIVERS TBS, RCK
RBA-RBB-RBC
RAK-RAL
RBO
RAK-RAL ICS
MN
RBH
MAN
REMOTE
CONTROL
UNITS
3 Navy
STANDARD
1 TBS
1 Navy
STANDARD
1 TBL Phone
2 Navy
STANDARD
1 TBL phone
1 TBS
1 TDQ
1 Navy
STANDARD
1 TBL phone
1 TBS
1 TDQ, 1 MN
TRANSFER
PANELS
Transmitter
Receiver
Transmitter
Receiver
   
FREQUENCY
METER
1 LR      

MOTOR GENERATORS: If the transmitter motor generators cannot be located as shown, they should be as near the transmitters as possible without being in the same room.

POWER PANEL: A changeover switch in the main radio room permits operation of all equipment from either the main generators or the emergency diesel power plant.

ANTENNAS: The large transmitting antennas enter the radio rooms through protective trunks, with an antenna disconnect and grounding switch at the transmitter end. The TBS, TDQ. MN and MAN antennas are mounted on the foremast and are connected to the transceivers with coaxial transmission line. Four receiving antennas, two port and two starboard, are suspended from the foremast yard arm. A 30-foot whip antenna serves the emergency radio receivers.

TRANSFER PANELS: Except for the small transceivers intended primarily for voice communication, all transmitters, receivers and Navy standard remote control units are wired to transfer panels. Patch cords may be plugged so any control unit can operate any transmitter, and any receiver output can be connected to any operating position.

 

10
 

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

NAVY STANDARD REMOTE CONTROL UNITS

1. PURPOSE: To start, key and stop transmitters from a remote operating position.

2. 4-WIRE SYSTEM:

(a) Toggle type start-stop switch.

(b) One wire is common to start-stop and keying circuits.

Fig. 9 Navy Standard 4-Wire Remote Control Unit.
Fig. 9 Navy Standard 4-Wire Remote Control Unit.

3. 6-WIRE SYSTEM:

(a) Momentary push-button type start-stop switches.

(b) Start-stop and keying circuits are isolated from each other.

(c) Additional control units in parallel on same line provide complete control at any unit.

Fig. 10 Navy Standard 6-Wire Remote Control Unit.
Fig. 10 Navy Standard 6-Wire Remote Control Unit.

4. CONVERSION FROM ONE SYSTEM TO THE OTHER: Any one ship uses either all 4-wire or all 6-wire controls. Transmitters may be converted by changing link connections according to the instruction book.

 

11
 

TAJ-18 TRANSMITTER

Fig. 11 TAJ-18 Transmitter (AC Model) Block Diagram.
Fig. 11 TAJ-18 Transmitter (AC Model) Block Diagram.

1. FREQUENCY RANGE: 175 to 600 kilocycles.

2. EMISSION:

(a) A-1 or CW up to 100 words per minute.

(b) A-2 or MCW up to 50 words per minute.

3. POWER OUTPUT:

(a) 500 watts CW.

(b) 250 watts MCW.

 

12
 

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

Fig. 12 TAJ-18 Transmitter (AC Model) Simplified Control and Power Circuits.
Fig. 12 TAJ-18 Transmitter (AC Model) Simplified Control and Power Circuits.

 

13
 

TAJ-18 CONTROL AND POWER CIRCUITS

1. PURPOSE: To simplify starting and stopping the transmitter, and to convert the line supply to the types of power required by the transmitter.

2. STARTING THE TRANSMITTER:

(a) When the main line switch is closed, 440 v 1 Φ AC is connected to the primary of the line transformer (T-103).

(b) When the EMERGENCY switch (S-110) is closed, 110 v AC from the secondary of T-103 is

available to the control circuits.

(c) Press MG START button (S-116) to energize master start relay (K-104).

(d) The holding contacts (K-104B) keep the master start relay energized after the START button is released.

(e) The POWER indicator lamp (I-101) remains on as long as K-104 is energized.

(f) The master start contacts K-104A energize the main line contactor, which closes the main line contacts to connect 440 v 3 Φ AC to the motor.

(g) The motor drives both the LV and the HV DC generators.

(h) The master start contacts K-104C energize the filament transformers (T-101 and T-102) from the line transformer (T-103).

(i) The master start contacts K-104D allow the shunt field of the LV DC generator to be self-excited from the 115-v DC armature.

3. ADJUSTING THE TRANSMITTER SUPPLY VOLTAGES:

(a) Filament voltage should be adjusted with MAIN FILAMENT control (R-123; R-133) for 11 v on FILAMENT VOLTAGE meter (M-106). -

(b) Bias voltage should be adjusted with BIAS FIELD control (R-125) for 115 v on BIAS VOLTAGE meter (M-107).

(c) High plate voltage should be adjusted with MAIN FIELD control (R-124) for 3000 v on PLATE VOLT-AGE meter (M-I09), with the TUNE-OPERATE switch (S-106) in OPERATE position.

4. STOPPING THE TRANSMITTER:

(a) Press MG STOP button (S-116) to de-energize master start relay (K-104).

(b) The holding contacts (K-104B) open, to keep the master start relay de-energized.

(c) Contacts K-104A de-energize the ma in line contactor, to disconnect the motor.

(d) Contacts K-104C disconnect the filament transformers (T-101 and T-102).

(e) Contacts K-104D disconnect the shunt field of the LV DC generator.

5. MASTER OSCILLATOR FILAMENT STANDBY:

(a) With MO FIL. standby switch (S-109) in TRANS. position, the MO filament is on only when the transmitter is on.

(b) With S-109 in LINE position, the MO filament transformer (T-102) is energized through R-122 and the normally closed contacts K-104E while all other operating voltages are disconnected.

 

14
 

Fig. 13 TAJ-18 Transmitter RF and AF Circuits.
Fig. 13 TAJ-18 Transmitter RF and AF Circuits.

 

15
 

TAJ-18 RF AND AF CIRCUITS

RF STAGES (ALL CLASS C)

1. MASTER OSCILLATOR (MO):

(a) Electron coupled type.

(b) Tuning range from 175 to 600 kilocycles.

(1) Coarse tuning in 7 steps with MO BAND CHANGE switch (S-101).

(2) Fine tuning with MO TUNING control (C-103).

(c) Frequency drift with changes in room temperature is compensated for by the negative temperature coefficient capacitor (C-157).

(d) The untuned plate circuit has a practically uniform frequency response over the entire 175 to 600 kc operating range.

2. INTERMEDIATE POWER AMPLIFIER (IPA):

(a) Tuning range from 175 to 600 kilocycles.

(1) Coarse tuning in seven steps with IPA, BAND CHANGE switch (S-102).

(2) Fine tuning with IPA TUNING control (C-113).

(b) For MCW operation, the IPA is plate modulated by the AUDIO OSCILLATOR (V7104).

3. FINAL POWER AMPLIFIER (PA):

(a) Tuning range from 175 to 600 kilocycles in the same manner as the IPA. The details omitted from the equivalent output circuit in Fig. 13 are shown in Fig. 14.

(b) For MCW operation, the negative grid bias is held constant over the audio cycle by the AF bypass capacitor (C-I55).

AUDIO OSCILLATOR (AO)

(a) Hartley type.

(b) Frequency 800 cycles.

(c) For CW operation, the EMISSION selector switch (S-107) turns off the AO filament and substitutes R-126.

 

16
 

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

Fig. 14 TAJ-18 Transmitter Antenna Circuit.
Fig. 14 TAJ-18 Transmitter Antenna Circuit.

1. PURPOSE: To match the impedance of the antenna to the impedance of the final RF power amplifier (V-103), and to tune the antenna to resonance.

2. COUPLING: The degree of coupling between the antenna and the transmitter is adjusted in 6 steps with ANTENNA,COUPLING control (S-104). The degree of coup-ling is maximum in position 6.

3. TUNING:

(a) The ANTENNA INDUCTANCE control (S-105) varies the amount of antenna loading in 15 steps.

(b) ANTENNA TUNING control (variometer L-111) is the vernier adjustment.

(c) Exact resonance at a quarter wavelength is indicated by a rise on ANTENNA CURRENT meter (M-105).

4. STATIC CHARGES: Any static charges that may build up on the antenna are grounded through the static drain RF choke (L-110).

 

17
 

TAJ-18 TRANSMITTER

Fig: 15 TAJ-18 Transmitter (AC Model) Keying Circuit.
Fig: 15 TAJ-18 Transmitter (AC Model) Keying Circuit.

1. GENERAL CIRCUIT CONDITIONS:

(a) All stages Class C.

(b) Protective fixed bias on the grids of both amplifier tubes.

(c) DC for the keying relay (K-103) is supplied from the bias generator.

2. OPERATION:

(a) With the TEST KEY (S-112) open, the keying relay (K-103) is not energized, and about 360 volts of positive bias exists on the filament returns of all stages. This corresponds to negative bias on the grids, and is sufficient to block all stages.

(b) When the TEST KEY (S-112) is closed, the keying relay (K-103) is energized. The main contacts short out the blocking bias and connect the filament returns to ground, so all stages operate normally.

(c) When the EMISSION switch (S-107) is in CW position, the AO filament is disconnected and a dummy load R7126 substituted to maintain normal filament supply voltage on the other stages. However, the keying circuit is not changed.

(d) The key click filter (R-134 and C-147) prevents arcing at the keying relay contacts to minimize key clicks.

(e) The key thump filter (R-135 and L-116) delays the plate current build up of the final power amplifier (V-103) enough to prevent excessive RF power surges when the key is first closed.

(f) The auxiliary contacts on the keying relay (K-103) are provided for operating a receiver protective relay if necessary.

 

18
 

TRANSMITTER SERVICING

Fig. 16 TBK-13 Transmitter (DC Model) Block Diagram.
Fig. 16 TBK-13 Transmitter (DC Model) Block Diagram.

1. FREQUENCY RANGE: 2,000 to 18,100 kilocycles.

2. EMISSION: A-1 or CW only.

3. POWER OUTPUT:

(a) HIGH POWER 500 watts over the entire frequency range.

(b) LOW POWER 75 watts, using the 2nd IPA as the final power amplifier. Available only from 2,000 to 9,050 kc because doubling is not permissible in the final stage.

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