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5
BOW AND STERN PLANE SYSTEMS
 
A. INTRODUCTION
 
5A1. General. Hydraulic power is used to tilt the bow and stern planes. Each system (bow and stern planes) has its own power supply system. Except in emergencies, the power facilities of each system are adequate for its own individual operation independent of power from the main hydraulic system.

The control units for diving and rising are assembled in a diving control stand, located in the control room. There is a set of controls for stern plane tilting, a set for bow plane tilting, and a control valve for bow plane rigging. The control panel also has diving indicators, gages, and motor switches.

Three methods of plane tilting are available at the control panel, based on three different sources of hydraulic power. They are designated as follows:

  a. POWER, in which power is developed independently in each plane tilting system by the motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump be longing to that system.

b. HAND, in which power is developed in the telemotor pump, connected to each system, by the manual efforts of the diving stand operator.

c. EMERGENCY, in which power is obtained from the main hydraulic system.

EMERGENCY is used only when the normally used POWER fails. HAND is employed when the other two sources are in operative, or when silent operation of the submarine is necessary to prevent detection by the enemy.

In addition to bow and stern plane tilting, this chapter also contains a description

Figure 5-1. Diving control stand.
Figure 5-1. Diving control stand.
 
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Figure 5-2. Piping diagram of stern plane system.
1) A-end pump; 2) motor; 3) control cylinder; 4) clutch; 5) vent and surge tank; 6) relief valve manifold; 7) capstan gear; 8) main cylinder; 9) stern
planes; 10) main diving wheel; 11) change valve handle; 12) telemotor pump; 13) emergency control wheel; 14) emergency control valve; 15) change valve;
16) vent and replenishing manifold; 17) pump-stroke setting lever.
Figure 5-2. Piping diagram of stern plane system.
1) A-end pump; 2) motor; 3) control cylinder; 4) clutch; 5) vent and surge tank; 6) relief valve manifold; 7) capstan gear; 8) main cylinder; 9) stern planes; 10) main diving wheel; 11) change valve handle; 12) telemotor pump; 13) emergency control wheel; 14) emergency control valve; 15) change valve; 16) vent and replenishing manifold; 17) pump-stroke setting lever.
 
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of bow plane rigging and forward windlass-and-capstan operation. Although they derive their hydraulic power from the main hydraulic system, they are very closely associated with bow plane tilting and are, therefore, described in the bow plane system instead of   in connection with the main hydraulic system.

A schematic view of the bow and stern plane systems and their associated equipment is illustrated in Figure 7-3 at the back of the book.

 
B. STERN PLANE SYSTEM
 
5B1. General arrangement. The units of the stern plane system fall conveniently into three groups:

a. The control units at the diving control panel, consisting of handwheel, telemotor pump, change valve, and emergency control valve.

b. The power supply system, consisting of a Waterbury A-end pump, the motor which drives it, the control cylinder, and two pressure relief valves.

c. The main cylinder and planes assembly, consisting of the hydraulic cylinder, the piston, the piston rod, the guide cylinder and guide piston, and the tiller which tilts the planes.

Figure 5-2 shows the units of the stern plane system in their proper schematic arrangement. It also includes miscellaneous equipment which will be described in detail in the following paragraphs.

The power and control units of the stern plane system are practically identical with the corresponding units of the steering system and hence, in the discussion which follows, frequent reference is made to illustrations of the steering system in Chapter 4.

5B2. Detailed description. a. The diving control stand. Both the bow and the stern diving planes are operated from the diving control stand Figure 5-1. Stern plane controls occupy the after half of the stand and bow plane controls occupy the forward half. The bow plane rigging control valve is at the bottom center of the panel on certain classes of submarines. We shall concern ourselves exclusively here with the location of control units for the stern plane system.

A schematic layout of the system as a whole is shown in Figure 5-2. Its control units correspond with those of the steering system,

  and their structure and functioning will be more clearly understood if frequent reference is made to the detailed description of parts in Section 4B2b. Similarities and differences are pointed out as they occur.

1. The control panel. One immediate difference to be seen between steering and diving plane controls is that the diving plane controls are all located on the front of a single panel; the various valves and units themselves are mounted behind the panel. Figure 5-3 is a front view of the stern plane half of the panel; Figure 5-4 shows the rear view.

2. The telemotor pump. The main wheel (1, Figure 5-3) rotates the telemotor pump (2) as on the steering stand. The function of the telemotor pump, as in the corresponding steering unit, is to drive hydraulic oil at low-pressure to one side or the other of the control cylinder, for POWER operation, or directly to one side or the other of the ram for HAND operation.

Like the steering stand telemotor pump, the diving stand telemotor pump has a one direction, variable-angle tilt-box. However, the control shaft on the steering stand telemotor pump has only two settings, POWER and HAND, while the control shaft on the diving stand may, theoretically at least, be set at any angle from ZERO stroke to FULL stroke, as shown by the pointer at the end of the pump-stoke setting lever (3), and read directly on the indicator dial (4).

In practice, the internal arrangement of the control shaft is such that it can never be set at absolute ZERO, that is, with the tilt-box at neutral, since some hydraulic power must be instantly available to the operator. To operate it at FULL stroke would take more physical strength than a normal man possesses.

This lever is usually set between 1/4-stroke for POWER operation and 3/4-stroke for

 
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Figure 5-3. Front view of diving control stand (stern
plane).
1) Stern plane main wheel, POWER and HAND; 2) stern
plane telemotor; 3) stern plane pump stroke setting
lever; 4) indicator dial pump-stroke setting; 5) stern
plane change valve lever; 6) stern plane change valve
mechanical interlock; 7) stern plane emergency control
valve; 8) stern plane emergency control valve
handwheel; 9) stern plane emergency control valve
quadrant gear; 10) stern plane motor switch.
Figure 5-3. Front view of diving control stand (stern plane).
1) Stern plane main wheel, POWER and HAND; 2) stern plane telemotor; 3) stern plane pump stroke setting lever; 4) indicator dial pump-stroke setting; 5) stern plane change valve lever; 6) stern plane change valve mechanical interlock; 7) stern plane emergency control valve; 8) stern plane emergency control valve handwheel; 9) stern plane emergency control valve quadrant gear; 10) stern plane motor switch.

HAND operation, depending on the strength of the operator.

3. The change valve. The function of the change valve on the diving stand is exactly the same as that of the corresponding unit on the steering stand. It allows the operator to select any one of the three available methods for controlling, the diving planes POWER, HAND, or EMERGENCY.

The only difference in internal structure of the two change valves is that on the diving stand the piston is moved up and down directly by the action of a lever instead of having a movable sleeve threaded into a revolving stem. It is operated, through linkage, by the change valve lever (5, Figure 5-3). A pointer at the hand end of this lever indicates the valve setting on the indicator plate of the change valve mechanical interlock (6).

The diagram, Figure 5-5, shows the change valve successively in all three positions: POWER, HAND, and EMERGENCY. The ports marked (1) go to opposite sides of the telemotor pump; those marked (2) go to the control cylinder; those marked (3) go to the ram. Active oil from the main power

  supply side of the line is shown in red; from the stern plane telemotor, in blue.

Note that in the EMERGENCY position the piston completely blanks off all lines entering the valve body. The purpose of this position is to prevent the high pressure oil from the main hydraulic system (used in emergency control) from reaching the telemotor pump and motorizing it, with consequent danger to equipment or personnel.

4. The emergency control valve. When the change valve lever (5, Figure 5-3) is set at EMERGENCY-NEUTRAL, its position in the cross-shaped groove of the mechanical interlock (6) permits the planes to be operated by the emergency control valve (7). This valve has the same function as the corresponding unit on the steering stand; it permits flow of hydraulic power from the main hydraulic system (in the event of failure of normal power) and directs it to one side or the other of the ram. The valve is operated by the emergency control valve handwheel (8) which,

Figure 5-4. Rear view of diving control stand (stern
plane).
1) Stern plane telemotor; 2) stern plane change valve;
3) stern plane change valve linkage; 4) stern plane
emergency control valve; 5) stern plane emergency
control valve linkage; 6) stern plane vent and
replenishing valve manifold.
Figure 5-4. Rear view of diving control stand (stern plane).
1) Stern plane telemotor; 2) stern plane change valve; 3) stern plane change valve linkage; 4) stern plane emergency control valve; 5) stern plane emergency control valve linkage; 6) stern plane vent and replenishing valve manifold.

 
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Figure 5-5. Change valve in three positions.
1) To telemotor; 2) to control cylinder; 3) to ram.
Figure 5-5. Change valve in three positions. 1) To telemotor; 2) to control cylinder; 3) to ram.
 
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when turned, moves the quadrant gear (9), and this in turn moves the emergency control valve piston in or out.

Figure 5-6 shows the emergency control valve successively in its three positions. The only difference in internal structure is that here the piston is moved in and out directly by the action of a lever, while on the steering stand unit it is a movable sleeve threaded into a rotating stem. The ports (1 and 2) go to the main hydraulic system; the ports (3 and 4) go to opposite ends of the ram, or actuating cylinder. Oil from the supply line of the main hydraulic system is shown in red; from the return side in blue. Direction of flow is shown by arrows.

5. Rear view of panel. A rear view of the same section (stern plane controls) of the control panel is shown in Figure 5-4. Shown here are some of the units of which only the control handles are visible in the front view (Figure 5-3). Only part of the telemotor pump (1) can be seen. At its end is mounted the change valve (2) whose piston and linkage (3) connect to the change valve hand lever on the front of the panel. A portion of the

  emergency control valve (4) can be seen, as well as its piston and linkage (5), which are moved by the quadrant gear seen in the front view. The vent and replenishing valve manifold is shown at (6).

b. Power supply system. 1. The Waterbury A-end pump. In normal operation, the hydraulic power is developed by a Waterbury A-end pump driven by a 7.1 horsepower electric motor at a constant speed of about 440 revolutions per minute.

This pump is identical with the A-end pump used in the steering system. It rotates in a clockwise direction as viewed from the motor end of the shaft. The speed and direction of oil delivery for the actuation of the main piston vary according to the angle of the tilt-box which is governed by the action of the control cylinder.

2. Control cylinder. As in the steering system, the angle of the tilt-box is determined by the action of the control cylinder (see Figure 5-7) which raises or lowers the control shaft of the A-end pump. Oil under pressure is directed from the telemotor pump to either side of the control cylinder (1) through the

Figure 5-6. Emergency control valve in three positions.
1) Port from supply line, main hydraulic system; 2) port from return line, main hydraulic system; 3) port from
stern plane ram, forward end; 4) port from stern plane ram, after end; 5) spool valve; 6) arm; 7) link;
8) shaft; 9) valve body.
Figure 5-6. Emergency control valve in three positions.
1) Port from supply line, main hydraulic system; 2) port from return line, main hydraulic system; 3) port from stern plane ram, forward end; 4) port from stern plane ram, after end; 5) spool valve; 6) arm; 7) link; 8) shaft; 9) valve body.
 
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Figure 5-7. Cutaway of control cylinder.
1) Cylinder; 2) piston; 3) bell crank; 4) crankshaft; 5) pump control arm; 6) mounting bracket; 7) port.
Figure 5-7. Cutaway of control cylinder.
1) Cylinder; 2) piston; 3) bell crank; 4) crankshaft; 5) pump control arm; 6) mounting bracket; 7) port.
ports (7) and act's against the piston (2). Displacement of the piston causes sidewise movement of the bell crank (3), which is transmitted to the pump control arm (5). The control shaft is attached directly to the tilt-box of the A-end pump so that the amount and direction of the-oil pumped by the A-end pump are determined by the action of the control cylinder. Thus far, this is similar in operation to the steering control cylinder. One difference may be seen in Figure 5-7. The centering spring, for returning the control shaft to a neutral position, is installed on the shaft on the same side at which it enters the Waterbury pump housing, instead of on the opposite side as in the steering system. Therefore, this spring is much shorter than that in the steering system   installation, to correspond with the shorter travel of the stern plane control cylinder plunger.

3. Relief valves. A relief valve is installed in each line just behind the ports of the Waterbury A-end pump, to prevent excessive pressure from developing in whichever line is functioning as the discharge line, by bypassing the oil back to the suction side of the pump.

c. The ram. The hydraulic power developed by the motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump is transmitted to the stern planes through the ram assembly (see Figure 5-8).

Unlike the steering system, the stern plane system has only a single ram, a cutaway

 
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Figure 5-8. Stern plane ram.
Figure 5-8. Stern plane ram.

view of which is shown in Figure 5-9. It consists of a hydraulic cylinder (1), through which slides a piston rod (2). To move this piston rod, hydraulic pressure is admitted to either one of the two ports (4), forcing the

  piston (3) to move away from that port. One end of the piston is connected through appropriate linkage to the stern plane tilting gear so that, as the piston moves one way or the other, it will tilt the planes to RISE or DIVE.

The after end of the piston slides through a guide, into which a keyway has been milled. A key attached to the piston shaft acts as a drift stop to regulate piston travel and also to keep the piston shaft, which consists of two separate pieces, from unscrewing in the piston. A pin mechanism which fits into a hole provided in the forward end of the shaft serves as a drift stop to regulate piston travel.

d. The capstan. The after capstan receives its power from a chain drive directly connected to the 7.1-horsepower electric motor, which also drives the stern plane Waterbury A-end pump. Thus, the power for the capstan does not come from any of the hydraulic units (see Figure 5-2).

Figure 5-9. Cutaway of stern plane ram.
1) Cylinder; 2) piston rod; 3) piston;
4) pressure port; 5) packing; 6) bracket frame.
Figure 5-9. Cutaway of stern plane ram.
1) Cylinder; 2) piston rod; 3) piston; 4) pressure port; 5) packing; 6) bracket frame.
 
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When the capstan is to be used, a coupling arrangement provides the means for connecting the chain drive to the motor shaft. This consists of a pair of spring-loaded pins attached to Woodruff keys which have two positions. In the ON position, the keys are engaged in keyways in both the motor-shaft collar and the chain-drive sprocket. In the OFF position, the keys are slid over to one side so that they engage only the motor-shaft keyway, but not the chain-drive keyway. This type of coupling does not disconnect the electric motor from the Waterbury A-end pump. On later classes of submarines, this clutch has been eliminated, since the chain is removed whenever the capstan is not being used.

5B3. Operation. a. Power operation. Figure 5-10 illustrates the operation of the stern plane system as a whole for tilting the planes to RISE by POWER. The pressure side of the line is shown in red, the return side in blue, inactive in lighter red, and the direction of flow is indicated by arrows.

The main wheel turns the shaft of the

  telemotor pump (1), driving oil at low-pressure through the uppermost part of the change valve (2) and into the after end of the control cylinder (3). The piston of the control cylinder moves forward, driving oil through the return line and into the middle port of the change valve, and from there back into the return port of the telemotor pump, completing the pressure-and-return cycle of the oil in the low pressure, or control, system. The control cylinder tilts the tilt-box in the motor driven A-end pump (4) which delivers oil at high pressure to the after end of the ram (5), moving the ram forward and forcing oil out of the other side of the ram and back to the return port of the Waterbury A-end pump. This completes the pressure-and-return cycle in the high pressure system. The forward motion of the ram, through the linkage, tilts the stern plane to RISE. When the planes are tilted to DIVE, the flow of oil is in the opposite direction and the pressure side becomes the return side.

b. Emergency operation. To operate by, EMERGENCY power, the change valve (2)

Figure 5-10. Flow diagram of stern plane system.
1) Telemotor; 2) change valve; 3) control cylinder; 4) motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump; 5) ram assembly;
6) emergency control valve; 7) quadrant gear; 8) emergency control handwheel; 9) pump-stroke control lever;
10) centering spring; 11) relief valve manifold.
Figure 5-10. Flow diagram of stern plane system.
1) Telemotor; 2) change valve; 3) control cylinder; 4) motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump; 5) ram assembly; 6) emergency control valve; 7) quadrant gear; 8) emergency control handwheel; 9) pump-stroke control lever; 10) centering spring; 11) relief valve manifold.
 
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Figure 5-11. Piping diagram of bow plane system.
1) Telemotor; 2) change valve; 3) emergency control valve; 4) pump-stroke control lever; 5) control cylinder; 6) motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump;
7) hydraulic cylinder; 8) plane stock; 9) rigging control valve; 10) windlass-and-capstan control-and-change valve; 11) Waterbury No. 10 B-end hydraulic
motor; 12) rigging windlass-and-capstan clutch; 13) rigging gear box; 14) shaft to windlass-and-capstan; 15) rigging interlock; 16) tilting interlock.
Figure 5-11. Piping diagram of bow plane system.
1) Telemotor; 2) change valve; 3) emergency control valve; 4) pump-stroke control lever; 5) control cylinder; 6) motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump; 7) hydraulic cylinder; 8) plane stock; 9) rigging control valve; 10) windlass-and-capstan control-and-change valve; 11) Waterbury No. 10 B-end hydraulic motor; 12) rigging windlass-and-capstan clutch; 13) rigging gear box; 14) shaft to windlass-and-capstan; 15) rigging interlock; 16) tilting interlock.
 
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is set at NEUTRAL-EMERGENCY. This blanks off the lines from the telemotor pump (1) so that high pressure oil cannot reach and motorize it. At the same time it also places the change valve hand lever in the horizontal slot of the quadrant gear (7). The emergency control handwheel (8) can now turn the quadrant gear left or right, moving the spool of the emergency control valve (6). This admits high pressure oil from the main hydraulic system directly to one side or the other of the ram (5), tilting the stern planes to RISE or DIVE.

c. Hand operation. For hand operation,

  the change valve (2) is set at HAND. This opens the lines from the telemotor pump (1) directly to the ram (5). The pump stroke lever (9) is set for a fuller stroke (the exact setting depending on the operator's strength), increasing the angle of the telemotor pump tilt-box, so that more oil will be driven through the lines for each turn of the wheel. When the main wheel is turned to RISE or DIVE, the telemotor pump delivers oil directly to one side or the other of the ram (5), instead of to the control cylinder as in the POWER operation. The movement of the ram tilts the stern planes to DIVE or RISE.
 
C. BOW PLANE SYSTEM
 
5C1. General. The bow plane tilting system is operated from the same control board as the stern planes (see Figure 5-1). From the control panel to the power supply units, the bow plane tilting system is identical with the stern plane system in equipment and operation. This includes all diving control units, A-end pump and motor, control cylinder, and pressure relief valves. But beyond this point there are important differences in the two systems.

The hydraulic cylinder assembly differs in that in the bow plane system the cylinder moves and the piston is stationary, which is the reverse of the arrangement for the stern plane system.

In addition to the tilting mechanism, the bow planes are also equipped with a rigging mechanism, which pulls them flush against the sides of the boat, or extends them to their normal operating position. Since it might damage the planes to rig them in while tilting at any considerable angle there must also be interlocks which automatically prevent rigging and tilting at the same time. The rigging mechanism receives its power from the main hydraulic system. However, because it functions as an essential unit of the bow plane controls, it is more convenient to describe it as part of the bow plane system.

The forward windlass-and-capstan operating gear, which also receives power from the main hydraulic system, is described in this section, since it is mechanically

  connected, through a clutch, with the rigging mechanism.

Figure 5-11 shows a general schematic diagram of the layout of units in this system.

5C2. Detailed arrangement. a. The tilting mechanism: power and control. As indicated, Waterbury A-end pump power supply and controlling, devices for the bow plane tilting system are identical with those of the stern

Figure 5-12. Ram and filler assembly.
1) Piston rod; 2) overhead frame; 3) hydraulic
cylinder; 4) filler; 5) plane stock; 6) bow plane;
7) linkage.
Figure 5-12. Ram and filler assembly.
1) Piston rod; 2) overhead frame; 3) hydraulic cylinder; 4) filler; 5) plane stock; 6) bow plane; 7) linkage.

 
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Figure 5-13. Cutaway of bow plane ram.
1) Hydraulic cylinder; 2) piston rod; 3) piston head; 4) linkage; 5) tiller; 6) packing; 7) plane stock; 8) cam;
9) link pins; 10) taper pin holes; 11) cylinder guide bearing; 12) securing pad; 13) port to piston rod; 14) port
to piston rod; 15) port to top of piston head; 16) port to bottom of piston head; 17) hub indicator dial;
18) sector gear; 19) quadrant gear; 20) angle transmitter shaft; 21) electric angle transmitter box.
Figure 5-13. Cutaway of bow plane ram.
1) Hydraulic cylinder; 2) piston rod; 3) piston head; 4) linkage; 5) tiller; 6) packing; 7) plane stock; 8) cam; 9) link pins; 10) taper pin holes; 11) cylinder guide bearing; 12) securing pad; 13) port to piston rod; 14) port to piston rod; 15) port to top of piston head; 16) port to bottom of piston head; 17) hub indicator dial; 18) sector gear; 19) quadrant gear; 20) angle transmitter shaft; 21) electric angle transmitter box.
 
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plane system just described (see Section 5B2). The bow plane tilting controls occupy the forward half of the control board (see Figure 5-1).

b. Cylinder and planes assembly. In the stern plane system, the cylinder is fixed, or stationary, and the piston moves. In the case of the bow planes (see Figure 5-12), the piston rod (1) is fixed to the overhead frame (2) and the cylinder (3) slides up and down on it. A heavy double crank, connected through linkage (7) to the body of the cylinder, serves as the tiller (4) which, through the stocks (5), tilts the bow planes (6).

Figure 5-13 shows a cutaway of the bow plane mechanism. The stationary piston rod (2) has a hole lengthwise through its center,

  from the top of the piston rod down to a point just above the piston. This hole leads into two ports, the edge of one of which (15) is shown just above the piston head (3). Another hole exactly like it (shown in the "broken" portion of the rod near the bottom of this view) leads from the bottom of the piston rod to similar ports, one of which (16) can be seen under the piston head. The pressure fittings (13 and 14) go to the hydraulic pressure lines. Oil enters at either of these fittings and goes through the hole and out the ports on either side of the piston head, forcing the cylinder (1) to slide
Figure 5-14. Cutaway of rigging control valve.
1) Valve body; 2) hand lever; 3) shaft for hand
lever; 4) link; 5) spool valve; 6) port to B-end motor;
7) port to B-end motor; 8) position pointer;
9) supply port from after service line; 10) vent line.
Figure 5-14. Cutaway of rigging control valve.
1) Valve body; 2) hand lever; 3) shaft for hand lever; 4) link; 5) spool valve; 6) port to B-end motor; 7) port to B-end motor; 8) position pointer; 9) supply port from after service line; 10) vent line.
 
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up or down. The linkage (4) moves the tiller (5), into the hub of which are fastened the bow plane stocks (7). The cam (8) serves to actuate the tilting interlock, which is described in the next section. The holes (10) are for taper pins (not shown) to hold the tiller shaft firmly in place inside the hub.

The hub indicator dial (17), graduated in degrees, shows the angle of rise or dive of the bow planes. A quadrant gear (19) is bolted to the bow plane stock. This engages with a sector gear (18), suspended from an angle frame. The position of the sector gear and planes is transmitted electrically to an indicator on the diving control stand, providing the operator with a continuous indication of the tilt of the bow planes.

c. The rigging mechanism. To bring the bow diving planes flush to the hull, when not actually in use, a mechanism is provided which will rig them in. This mechanism consists of two heavy connecting rods actuated, through suitable linkage and gear trains, by a Waterbury B-end motor in the forward torpedo room and controlled by a rigging control valve located at bottom center of the diving control board in the control room a change valve, and suitable interlocks, to protect the system against operational errors.

Figure 5-14 shows a cutaway view of this rigging control valve which is a spool-type valve. The hand lever (2), through the

  connecting link (4), moves the spool valve (5) up and down, admitting pressure from the main hydraulic system through the supply port (9), out through the ports (6 or 7), through the rigging interlock, tilting interlock, and change valve, to the B-end hydraulic motor. The motor used is a No. 10-B Waterbury hydraulic motor, the only B-end motor used on the vessel. A No. 10 Waterbury B-end motor is installed because the power requirements of the heavy rigging gear and the forward windlass-and-capstan exceed the capacity of a No. 5 Waterbury B-end. To rig in, the handle is raised to the RIG IN position; to rig out, it is lowered to the RIG OUT position; the intermediate position is NEUTRAL. The pointer (8) indicates these positions on a name plate (not shown) attached to the control board.

Figure 5-15 shows the internal structure of the rigging control valve in each of its three positions. The port marked (1) is connected to the supply, or pressure, side of the service line of the main hydraulic system; the port marked (2) is connected to the return side. The two ports marked (3) go through the rigging and tilting interlocks to opposite sides of the Waterbury B-end, hydraulic motor. Oil from the supply side is shown in red; oil from the return side in blue. Direction of flow is indicated by arrows.

A diagram of the rigging gear layout as a whole is shown in Figure 5-16. The rigging

Figure 5-15. Rigging control valve in three positions.
1) From after service line, supply; 2) to after service line, return; 3) to Waterbury B-end hydraulic motor.
Figure 5-15. Rigging control valve in three positions.
1) From after service line, supply; 2) to after service line, return; 3) to Waterbury B-end hydraulic motor.
 
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control valve (1) receives the power from the after service line (2) and directs this power through the interlocks and change valve (3) to one side or the other of the Waterbury B-end motor (4), causing the shaft (5) to turn in the required direction. The two bevel gear boxes (6) transmit its motion to the upper horizontal shaft (7) where, through a spur gear (8), it is transmitted to the large sector gears (9). These gears pull in or push out the connecting rods (10) which rig the diving planes (11) in or out. Leakage is prevented at the point where the vertical shaft passes through the pressure hull by a brass-lined stuffing box containing 1/2-inch-square rings of flax packing.

The diving planes (11) are connected to the outboard end of the connecting rod by a ball-and-socket joint (12) which permits sufficient lateral rotation to allow for tilting at least 25 degrees in either direction.

d. The rigging and tilting interlocks. If an attempt were made to rig in the planes while tilted, or to tilt them while rigged in, either the hull or the planes, or both, would be damaged. To prevent this, two valves called

  interlocks are placed in the line through which the hydraulic power must pass on its way to the rigging and tilting mechanisms. They are known as the rigging and tilting interlocks.

The rigging interlock is a three-spool piston valve, mechanically operated by the rigging worm gear, which prevents tilting of the planes until they are fully rigged out. The interlock also acts as a throttle or cut-out, to retard the flow of oil to the Waterbury B-end motor when the planes are almost in the rigged-in or rigged-out position. To allow the rigging sector gears to come against their positive stops gently, the line delivering the pressure oil to the Waterbury B-end motor is completely blocked by the valve when the planes are in the fully rigged-in or rigged-out position.

The tilting interlock is a single-spool valve piston that prevents rigging in of the planes when the planes are on any degree of rise or beyond 15 degrees' dive. It will allow rigging in when the planes are between 0 degrees' and 15 degrees' dive.

1. The tilting interlock. The line carrying power to rig out the planes must pass

Figure 5-16. Bow plane rigging system.
1) Rigging control valve; 2) after service line; 3) change valve; 4) Waterbury B-end motor; 5) shaft; 6) bevel
gear boxes; 7) horizontal shaft; 8) spur gear; 9) sector gear; 10) connecting rods; 11) diving planes; 12) ball-and-socket joint.
Figure 5-16. Bow plane rigging system. 1) Rigging control valve; 2) after service line; 3) change valve; 4) Waterbury B-end motor; 5) shaft; 6) bevel gear boxes; 7) horizontal shaft; 8) spur gear; 9) sector gear; 10) connecting rods; 11) diving planes; 12) ball-and-socket joint.
 
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through the tilting interlock (see Figure 5-17). When the planes are moving to zero degrees' tilt, the cam (10) on the tiller will raise the roller lever (3), turning the crankshaft (4) to the left which, through the bell crank (5) and link (6) moves the spool valve (2) to the OPEN position, allowing the oil which operates the rigging gear to pass through the valve. However, when the shaft turns in either direction- RISE or DIVE -the high point of the cam moves away from the roller on the roller lever, and a return spring (7) pushes the spool valve back into the CLOSED position, cutting off the line to the rigging gear.

A special feature of this interlock deserves attention. If, while rigged in, the planes should be accidentally knocked out of position by enemy gunfire, depth charge, or some other circumstance beyond the control of the operator, the resulting tilt and position of the cam might close the interlock and prevent rigging the planes out into their operating

  position just when the need for diving control was most urgent. To provide against such an emergency, a check valve (8) is built into the tilting interlock, which will allow rigging power to pass through even when the spool valve is closed, but only in the rigging out direction.

2. The rigging interlock. The line carrying power to tilt the planes must pass through the rigging interlock (see Figure 5-18). The shackle (3) is connected to an eccentric cam arrangement on the rigging gear drive shaft. When the gear is in the fully rigged-out position, this cam will have pushed the piston valve spool (2) all the way to the right, thereby opening the ports (5) in the tilting line and allowing the power which operates the tilting gear to pass. But with the gear in the rigged-in position, the spool valve (2) will be pulled to the CLOSED position, cutting off the ports to the tilting gear oil lines.

Figure 5-17. Cutaway of tilting interlock.
1) Valve body; 2) spool valve; 3) roller arm lever; 4) shaft; 5) crank lever; 6) link; 7) valve spring; 8) check
valve; 9) check valve spring; 10) cam.
Figure 5-17. Cutaway of tilting interlock.
1) Valve body; 2) spool valve; 3) roller arm lever; 4) shaft; 5) crank lever; 6) link; 7) valve spring; 8) check valve; 9) check valve spring; 10) cam.
 
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The rigging interlock has an additional function. To eliminate the shock of the rigging gear hitting the hard stop at each end while rotating at full power, the rigging lines themselves pass through the rigging interlock in such a way that when the rigging gear is approaching either the fully rigged-in or fully rigged-out position, the rigging power line will be partially closed off by the action of the rigging interlock spool valve, bringing the gear to an easy stop.

The check valves (7, Figure 5-18) allow pressure oil to pass in one direction, RIG IN or RIG OUT. They permit the operation of the gear to begin when the cam action upon the spool valve has closed off the rigging lines. As the ports in these lines are then opened by the spool valve, the check valves close again.

e. Operation to rig out. Figure 5-19 shows the direction of flow of hydraulic pressure in the rigging system for rigging out. The pressure side of the line is shown in red, the return side in blue; the direction of flow

  is shown by arrows. Inactive oil is shown in lighter red.

The bow planes are assumed to be between zero tilt and 15 degrees' dive, and the cam on the tiller hub (1) is therefore at its highest point under the lever arm when at zero tilt, holding the spool valve of the tilting interlock (2) in the OPEN position. The handle of the rigging control valve (3) is placed in the RIG OUT position, moving the spool valve up. This allows oil from the supply side of the after service line to enter the control valve at (4) and go out through the line (5), through the rigging interlock (6) whose spool valve is open to permit the RIG OUT pressure to pass after the planes begin to rig with the initial flow through the check valve. From there it passes in through the right-hand port of the tilting interlock (7) and out of the left-hand port through the windlass-and-capstan and bow plane rigging change valve (8), and into one side of the Waterbury B-end hydraulic motor (9). The pressure oil rotates the motor, turning the

Figure 5-18. Cutaway of rigging interlock.
1) Valve body; 2) spool valve; 3) shackle; 4) packing; 5) ports to tilting lines; 6) ports to rigging lines;
7) check valves.
Figure 5-18. Cutaway of rigging interlock.
1) Valve body; 2) spool valve; 3) shackle; 4) packing; 5) ports to tilting lines; 6) ports to rigging lines; 7) check valves.
 
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Figure 5-19. Bow plane system in rigging position.
1) Cam on tiller; 2) tilting interlock spool valve; 3) rigging control valve; 4) port, from supply side, after
service line; 5) port, to B-end motor; 6) rigging interlock; 7) tilting interlock; 8) change valve; 9) B-end
motor; 10) drive shaft; 11) clutch handle; 12) bevel gears; 13) rigging gear drive shaft; 14) cam to operate
rigging interlock; 15) worm and gear; 16) clutch to change valve connecting rod; 17) windlass-and-capstan
control valve; 18) windlass-and-capstan control shaft; 19) windlass-and-capstan drive shaft; 20) port, to return side, after service line.
Figure 5-19. Bow plane system in rigging position.
1) Cam on tiller; 2) tilting interlock spool valve; 3) rigging control valve; 4) port, from supply side, after service line; 5) port, to B-end motor; 6) rigging interlock; 7) tilting interlock; 8) change valve; 9) B-end motor; 10) drive shaft; 11) clutch handle; 12) bevel gears; 13) rigging gear drive shaft; 14) cam to operate rigging interlock; 15) worm and gear; 16) clutch to change valve connecting rod; 17) windlass-and-capstan control valve; 18) windlass-and-capstan control shaft; 19) windlass-and-capstan drive shaft; 20) port, to return side, after service line.
 
Figure 5-20. Bow plane system in tilting position.
1) Telemotor; 2) change valve; 3) emergency control valve; 4) motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump;
5) hydraulic cylinder; 6) bow plane assembly; 7) rigging interlock; 8) rigging gear interlock cam.
Figure 5-20. Bow plane system in tilting position.
1) Telemotor; 2) change valve; 3) emergency control valve; 4) motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump; 5) hydraulic cylinder; 6) bow plane assembly; 7) rigging interlock; 8) rigging gear interlock cam.
 
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drive shaft (10) whose motion, through the clutch (11), worm gear, and bevel gears (12), is transmitted to the rigging gear shaft (13), thereby rigging out the planes.

Meanwhile, oil from the return port of the B-end motor passes back through the change valve, thence through the rigging interlock (whose spool valve still permits it to pass), to the return side of the rigging control valve, and through its return port (20) to the after return service line. This completes its cycle from the supply manifold to the return manifold of the main hydraulic system.

As the planes approach the fully rigged out position, the rigging interlock spool valve begins to cut off the flow of oil. The B-end motor is slowed down and the sector gears are brought to an easy stop.

f. Operation to dive. Figure 5-20 shows the direction of flow of hydraulic pressure in the bow plane tilting system for DIVE. The pressure side of the line is shown in red, the return side in blue, the direction of flow is shown by arrows. Inactive oil is shown in lighter red.

It is to be assumed that the gear is in the fully rigged-out position, so that the cam (8) which moves the spool valve of the rigging interlock (7) is in a position which will permit oil from the tilting system to pass. The handwheel on the telemotor pump (1) is turned to the right, driving oil out of the uppermost port of the range valve (2) to the right-hand side of the control cylinder.

The oil on the opposite side of the control cylinder passes back through the change valve to the return side of the telemotor pump, completing the pressure-and-return cycle in the low pressure, or control, system.

The movement of oil in the control cylinder has actuated the bell-crank linkage connecting the plunger with the control shaft in the motor-driven Waterbury A-end pump. When the tilt-box in the motor-driven Waterbury pump (4) is tilted, its pistons then pump oil at high pressure through the relief valve manifold and into the line to the lower end of the hollow piston rod on the actuating cylinder assembly (5). This admits oil through

  the small ports on the underside of the piston rod, into the lower side of the cylinder, causing it to move downward, and tilting the bow plane (6) to DIVE. Meanwhile, oil is driven out of the upper side of the cylinder, through the ports above the piston, thence through the upper end of the piston rod, into the reline. From there it passes through the rigging interlock (7) and back through the opposite side of the relief manifold into the return port (the left port) of the motor-driven Waterbury pump, completing the pressure-and-return cycle in the high pressure system.

When the bow plane is tilted to RISE, the flow of oil is in the opposite direction from that shown in Figure 5-20 and the pressure side becomes the return side.

g. Windlass-and-capstan clutch and change-and-control valve. The change-and-control valve and windlass-and-capstan clutch, which are structurally associated with the rigging system, are shown in Figures 5-19 and 5-20. Further examination of Figure 5-19 will be of help in understanding their function. The change valve (8, Figure 5-19) serves as a selector unit for the B-end motor (9), determining by its position whether the B-end receives power through the windlass-and-capstan control valve (17), with which the change valve is integrally mounted in a single housing (see Figure 5-21), or through the rigging control valve (3, Figure 5-19).

The change valve is operated by linkage from the clutch (11, Figure 5-19), which, like the change valve, has two positions: RIGGING and WINDLASS-AND-CAPSTAN.

As the clutch is moved into the required position, the clutch connecting rod (16), through linkage, moves the piston in the change valve (8) into a position which lines up the ports leading to the B-end motor (9) with the ports leading to the rigging control valve (3). Then this valve will operate the B-end motor to rig the bow planes in or out. This valve receives its power from the after service lines.

1. Clutch in RIGGING position. When the clutch (11, Figure 5-19) is in the RIGGING position, the rotary motion of the shaft of the

 
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B-end motor (9) is transmitted through the worm and gear (15) to the horizontal drive shaft (13) which operates the rigging gear.

2. Clutch in WINDLASS-AND-CAPSTAN position. When the clutch (11, Figure 5-19) is placed in the WINDLASS-AND-CAPSTAN position, the rotary motion of the shaft of the B-end motor (9) is transmitted through the gear box to the horizontal stub shaft (19) which drives the windlass-and capstan gear.

At the same time, the clutch connecting rod (16) moves the piston in the change valve (8) into a position which lines up the ports from the B-end motor with the windlass-and-capstan control valve, through internal channels inside the change-and-control valve housing (13, Figure 5-21). The B-end motor can now be operated by the windlass-and-capstan control valve (17, Figure 5-19). This valve receives its hydraulic power from the forward service lines.

It must be clearly understood that the clutch handle performs two functions simultaneously: (1) it connects the drive shaft of the hydraulic motor either to the rigging gear or to the windlass-and-capstan gear; (2) it

  lines up the change valve either with the rigging control valve or with the windlass-and-capstan control valve (17, Figure 5-19). At no time can the rigging gear and the windlass-and-capstan gear be operated simultaneously, since the clutch-and-change valve can be in only one position at a time.

Figure 5-21 shows a cutaway view of the change-and-control valve. The windlass-and-capstan control mechanism is seen at the left of the unit, the change valve mechanism at the right. The clutch connecting rod (6), through the lever arm (5), crankshaft (4), and bell crank (3), moves the change valve piston (2) to the desired position. When lined up to permit operation of the windlass-and-capstan mechanism, controlling is then done by the windlass-and-capstan control shaft (10), which extends up to the main deck. This shaft has a squared end over which a special T-wrench is placed for operation of the wind lass-and-capstan gear. The shaft turns the threaded portion of the nonrising stem (8), which raises and lowers the sleeve (9), opening and closing the desired combination of ports in the control valve, and thereby directing pressure from the forward service lines of the main hydraulic system to one side or the other of the Waterbury B-end motor.

 
D. OTHER BOW PLANE SYSTEMS
 
5D1. Bow plane system on earlier classes of submarines. On earlier classes of submarines, a bow plane tilting system which differs in some important details from the one just described is still being used (see Figure 5-22).

From the diving control stand to the A-end pump, the older system is the same as the system described. This includes the controls, the A-end pump and the motor which drives it, and the control cylinder.

Here the resemblance ends. In this system the Waterbury A-end pump delivers oil under pressure to a Waterbury No. 5 B-end motor (4), instead of directly to a main cylinder or ram. The rotary motion developed by the B-end motor is transmitted through a gear box (5) to rotate the herringbone gear (6) clockwise or counterclockwise. The direction and rate of rotation are, of course, determined

  by the angle of the tilt-box in the A-end PUMP.

Finally, the herringbone gear, which is meshed with the sector gear (7), turns the tiller (8) which is attached by a collar to the plane stocks (9).

On submarines in which this combination of A-end and B-end Waterbury gears is used for bow plane tilting, the planes are rigged by means of an electric motor.

However, the forward windlass-and-capstan is hydraulically operated also by a combination of a Waterbury No. 5 A-end and a No. 10 B-end speed gear. The A-end pump receives its power from the electric motor which drives the rigging gear. A clutch directs the motor power to either the rigging or the A-end of the windlass-and-capstan, as

 
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Figure 5-21. Cutaway of change-and-control valve.
1) Change valve body; 2) change valve; 3) bell crank; 4) crankshaft; 5) lever arm; 6) clutch connecting
rod; 7) windlass-and-capstan control valve; 8) nonrising stem; 9) traveling sleeve; 10) windlass-and-capstan
control shaft; 11) ports to rigging control valve; 12) port to forward service line; 13) internal channels,
from change valve to windlass-and-capstan control valve.
Figure 5-21. Cutaway of change-and-control valve.
1) Change valve body; 2) change valve; 3) bell crank; 4) crankshaft; 5) lever arm; 6) clutch connecting rod; 7) windlass-and-capstan control valve; 8) nonrising stem; 9) traveling sleeve; 10) windlass-and-capstan control shaft; 11) ports to rigging control valve; 12) port to forward service line; 13) internal channels, from change valve to windlass-and-capstan control valve.
 
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Figure 5-22. Diagram of bow plane system using Waterbury A-end and B-end.
1) Waterbury A-end pump; 2) control cylinder; 3) motor; 4) Waterbury B-end motor; 5) gear box; 6) herring bone gear; 7) sector gear; 8) tiller; 9) plane stocks; 10) relief valve manifold; 17) hand and emergency tilting lines.
Figure 5-22. Diagram of bow plane system using Waterbury A-end and B-end.
1) Waterbury A-end pump; 2) control cylinder; 3) motor; 4) Waterbury B-end motor; 5) gear box; 6) herring bone gear; 7) sector gear; 8) tiller; 9) plane stocks; 10) relief valve manifold; 17) hand and emergency tilting lines.
desired. Both cannot be operated simultaneously. A control on the top deck is connected to the control shaft of the A-end, enabling the operator to regulate the speed and direction of the windlass-and-capstan operation.

5D2. Bow plane system on Electric Boat Company submarines. a. General arrangement. On recent classes of submarines built by the Electric Boat Company the bow plane system differs considerably from that described in sections 5C1 and 5C2. The new system is shown schematically in Figure 5-23. Its similarities to and differences from the Portsmouth type are described in following section.

b. Detailed description. 1. Control units. Except for minor modifications in appearance, the main wheel and telemotor pump (1, Figure 5-23), change valve (2), and emergency control valve, (4) in the Electric Boat Company bow plane system are practically identical with the corresponding installation on the Portsmouth boats. The rigging, control valve is also basically the same, in that it directs hydraulic power from the main hydraulic system to rig the planes (21) in or out.

However, there are many important differences in the two systems.

  The most radical departure from the Portsmouth System is found in the hand rigging and tilting arrangement. In the Electric Boat Company system, the bow planes can be rigged in or out by hand, by the use of the telemotor pump in the bow plane tilting system.

This requires a special change valve in addition to the one with which we are already familiar, to direct the power developed by hand in the bow plane telemotor pump to either the tilting or the rigging system.

2. Hand rigging and tilting control valve. This special valve, called the hand rigging and tilting control valve (8, Figure 5-23), has three positions, TILT, RIG, and NEUTRAL. When it is placed at TILT, it allows oil pressure from the bow plane telemotor pump to pass to the bow plane tilting cylinder (19). At RIG, it directs the pressure to the B-end motor (17) which operates the rigging gear. At NEUTRAL, both these lines are off.

As a study of Figure 5-23 shows, the hand rigging and tilting control valve is mechanically interlocked with the normal (power) rigging control valve (7) in such a way that the handle (9) of the power-rigging valve cannot be moved from its own NEUTRAL position unless the handle (11) of the hand rigging and tilting valve is at NEUTRAL.

 
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Figure 5-23. Bow plane system used in Electric Boat Company submarines, POWER tilting.
1) Telemotor and main handwheel; 2) change valve; 3) emergency control valve handwheel; 4) emergency control valve; 5) motor-driven A-end pump;
6) control cylinder; 7) rigging control valve; 8) hand tilting and rigging control valve; 9) rigging control valve handle, 10) solenoid release handle;
11) rigging-tilting control handle; 12) tilting cut-out; 13) rigging cut-out; 14) bow plane rigging gear; 15) clutch for rigging and windlass-and-capstan;
16) windlass-and-capstan gear; 17) Waterbury B-end motor; 18) windlass-and-capstan control valve; 19) tilting cylinder; 20) piston; 21) bow plane.
Figure 5-23. Bow plane system used in Electric Boat Company submarines, POWER tilting. 1) Telemotor and main handwheel; 2) change valve; 3) emergency control valve handwheel; 4) emergency control valve; 5) motor-driven A-end pump; 6) control cylinder; 7) rigging control valve; 8) hand tilting and rigging control valve; 9) rigging control valve handle, 10) solenoid release handle; 11) rigging-tilting control handle; 12) tilting cut-out; 13) rigging cut-out; 14) bow plane rigging gear; 15) clutch for rigging and windlass-and-capstan; 16) windlass-and-capstan gear; 17) Waterbury B-end motor; 18) windlass-and-capstan control valve; 19) tilting cylinder; 20) piston; 21) bow plane.
 
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3. Solenoid locking device. The Electric Boat Company bow plane system does not have the hydraulic interlock valves between the rigging and tilting systems which, in the Portsmouth system, prevent rigging while the planes are tilted, or tilting while they are rigged in.

Instead, there is a spring-loaded plunger, actuated by an electrical solenoid, or magnetic coil (10), which locks the rigging control valve in NEUTRAL whenever the planes are tilted to any degree of rise or more than 15 degrees' dive.

The solenoid is operated by a contact maker on the bow plane ram (19). When the planes are anywhere between zero tilt and 15 degrees' dive, the solenoid is closed, or energized; the plunger is held out by magnetic force, and the rigging control valve is unlocked and ready to function. As soon as the ram has moved, however, to tilt the planes to any degree of rise, or to more than 15 degrees' dive, the contact maker opens the circuit to the solenoid, the magnetic coil is deenergized, and the loading spring snaps the plunger into the hole, locking the rigging valve in NEUTRAL, as seen in Figure 5-23.

The solenoid can still be pulled out, however, by a manually operated electric push-button on the control panel, which is itself spring-loaded and will energize the solenoid only while the operator holds the button down with his finger.

In the event of failure of the electric power, the solenoid plunger control as a last resort be pulled out by hand to allow emergency operation of the rigging valve.

4. Hydraulic cut-out valves. In the description of the Portsmouth system of hydraulic interlock valves, it was explained that the rigging interlock (Portsmouth design only) not only controlled the passage of tilting pressure, but also acted as an automatic cut-out in the rigging pressure lines themselves to prevent the rigging gears from coming against the hard stops at each end of their travel (see Section 5C2d).

In the Electric Boat Company system, there are no hydraulic interlocks, but both

  the tilting and rigging lines pass through automatic cut-out valves, similar in principle to the rigging interlock cut-out feature on the Portsmouth design. The rotation of the rigging gears in either direction operates a pair of automatic cut-out valves (12 and 13) which, as the rigged-in or rigged-out position is approached, cuts off the flow of oil in the rigging or tilting lines.

5. Actuating units. As in the Portsmouth installation, the bow planes are tilted by the action of a hydraulic cylinder and are rigged in and out by a No. 10 B-end Waterbury speed gear used as a hydraulic motor.

a) Tilting. (See Figure 5-23.) It will be recalled that, in the Portsmouth boat, the bow plane hydraulic cylinder arrangement was somewhat unusual in that the piston was fixed, while the cylinder moved up and down over it. However, in the Electric Boat Company design, the bow plane tilting arrangement is more familiar-the cylinder (19) is fixed and the planes (21) are tilted by the movement of a piston, or ram (20). In appearance and operation this bow plane ram is practically identical with the stern plane ram on the Portsmouth boat.

b) Rigging. The mechanism used for rigging (14, 15, and 17, Figure 5-23) is practically identical with that described in connection with the Portsmouth boats.

c. Operation of Electric Boat Company system. 1. Tilting by normal POWER. Figure 5-23 illustrates schematically In the flow of oils in the Electric Boat Company system during the operation of tilting to RISE by normal POWER. As will be seen by a comparison with Figure 5-20, this operation is the same as the corresponding operation on the Portsmouth boat.

Active pressure oil is shown in red, active return oil in blue; oil in the inactive parts of the system is shown in lighter red. Direction of flow is indicated by arrows.

2. Rigging by HAND. Figure 5-24 illustrates the operation involving the most radical differences between this system and the Portsmouth: namely, rigging out by HAND.

 
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Figure 5-24. Bow plane system used in Electric Boat Company submarines, HAND rigging.
1) Telemotor and main handwheel; 2) change valve; 3) emergency control valve handwheel; 4) emergency control valve; 5) motor-driven A-end pump; 6) control cylinder; 7) rigging control valve; 8) hand tilting and rigging control valve; 9) rigging control valve handle; 10) solenoid release handle;
11) rigging-tilting control handle; 12) tilting cut-out; 13) rigging cut-out; 14) bow plane rigging gear; 15) clutch for rigging and windlass-and-capstan;
16) windlass-and-capstan gear; 17) Waterbury B-end motor; 18) windlass-and-capstan control valve; 19) tilting cylinder; 20) piston; 21) bow plane.
Figure 5-24. Bow plane system used in Electric Boat Company submarines, HAND rigging.
1) Telemotor and main handwheel; 2) change valve; 3) emergency control valve handwheel; 4) emergency control valve; 5) motor-driven A-end pump; 6) control cylinder; 7) rigging control valve; 8) hand tilting and rigging control valve; 9) rigging control valve handle; 10) solenoid release handle; 11) rigging-tilting control handle; 12) tilting cut-out; 13) rigging cut-out; 14) bow plane rigging gear; 15) clutch for rigging and windlass-and-capstan; 16) windlass-and-capstan gear; 17) Waterbury B-end motor; 18) windlass-and-capstan control valve; 19) tilting cylinder; 20) piston; 21) bow plane.
 
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Active pressure oil is shown in red, active return oil in blue; oil in the inactive parts of the system is shown in lighter red. Direction of flow is indicated by arrows.

The bow plane change valve (2) is set at HAND.

The handle (9) of the power rigging valve (7) is at NEUTRAL, locked there by the solenoid plunger (10).

The handle (11) of the hand rigging and tilting control valve (8) is set at RIG.

Now the telemotor pump (1) is activated by rotating the main wheel to the right (clockwise). This sends oil under pressure through the upper part of the telemotor pump, through the - change valve and hand rigging and tilting control valve, and into one of the rigging lines, which leads to the Waterbury No. 10 B-end motor (17).

The return oil from the Waterbury motor follows the same path in reverse, except that it must pass through the rigging cut-out (13) on its way back to the change valve and telemotor pump. As the planes approach the fully rigged-out position, this cut-out will automatically shut off the flow of oil in the circuit, allowing the oil to be bypassed through a small-sized pipe and throttling valve which slows down the hydraulic motor.

d. Forward windlass-and-capstan operation. In this system there is no change valve

  for windlass-and-capstan operation. There is only a control valve (18, Figure 5-23) which is located in the forward torpedo room. The windlass-and-capstan receives its power from the Waterbury B-end motor (17) which operates the rigging gear. A slide clutch (15) engages one of the two services it operates. When one service is engaged through the clutch, the other is disconnected. A contact maker on the windlass-and-capstan control valve handle indicates in the control room which way the clutch is engaged.

NOTE. 1. Due to the requirement that the bow planes be rigged out in the specified time with only one main hydraulic plant pump in operation, the Waterbury No. 10-B motor has been replaced by a No. 10-A unit with provisions for placing the tilt block on reduced stroke during rigging out, and on full stroke during rigging in. Since the power requirement during rigging out of the planes is not great, the No. 10-A motor is run at an increased speed during this period as the displacement per revolution has been reduced by decreasing the stroke. The other features of this installation as previously described remain essentially the same.

2. On later classes of the Electric Boat Company design, the hand rigging and tilting control valve has been discarded and the bow plane change valve has been redesigned to incorporate the features previously found in the aforementioned control valve.

 
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