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SUPPLEMENT

Information Applicable to Naval Practices

 

I. HOW TO LAY OUT A MAIN WIREWAY

A. Supplies, tools, and equipment

Blueprints  
Paper
Compass
T-square
Pencils
Ruler
Triangle
Drawing board

B. Procedure

1. OBTAIN MAIN WIREWAY PRINT AND DETERMINE THE RUNS.

a. Check master sheet to obtain the blueprint number.

b. Determine where the prints are kept.

c. Secure the prints.

d. Select the section to be laid out.

e. Locate the bulkheads, and note the frame numbers.

f. Note whether the bulkheads are watertight or non-watertight, aluminum or steel.

g. Study the section selected very closely, noting every detail.

1) Check the following details on the blueprint:

a) Cable rack width and type of hangers used (See method print.)

b) Cable rack length

c) Cable rack clearance

d) Insulated areas and type of hangers used (See method print.)

e) Non-insulated areas and type of hangers used (See method print.)

f) Slots in beams, etc., for the cable run, size, and location

g) Up and down tube areas and type of tubes (See method print.)

h) Note where cables are to be run beneath or over pipes, below beams, etc.

 
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B. Procedure (continued)

i) Check print closely to determine if there will be any obstruction in the runs, drains, vents, etc.

h. Learn cable designations and their meaning.

1) Cable designations

DCP Double conductor portable
DHFA Duplex heat flame resistant armored
FHFA Four conductor heat flame resistant armored
GICF General I.S. Flexible
MCP Multiple conductor portable
MHFA Multiple conductor heat flame resistant armored
SHFA Single conductor heat flame resistant armor
SRHLA Single conductor radio high tension lead armor
SRLL Single conductor radio low tension lead
TCP Triple conductor portable
THFA Triplex heat flame resistant armored
TTHFA Twisted pair telephone heat flame resistant armored
Cabloy Radio cable (radio frequency capacity)
SLPP Single light and power, plain
SLPA Single light and power, armored
DLPP Duplex light and power, plain
DLPA Duplex light and power, armored
DLB Duplex lighting, braided
FLP Four conductor, plain
FLA Four conductor, armored

Note: The prefix letter on all cables except the "M" cable indicates the number of conductors in the cable.

The suffix numeral on all cables except the "M" cable indicates the size of the conductors in 1,000 C.M. (circular mils).

The prefix letter "M" on cables indicates a multiple conductor cable (two or more conductors) and the suffix numeral represents the number of conductors.

The size of the wire in all "M" conductor cables is No. 16.

i. Learn to distinguish the circuits by the circuit markings on the blueprint.

 
109
 
B. Procedure (continued)
1) Lighting and power

F General lighting and power
FB Battle lighting and power
XFE Emergency lighting and power

When no numeral precedes the circuit marking, the circuit is a feeder

FB 100

When a numeral precedes the circuit marking, and no letter or number follows the marking, the circuit is a main.

1 - FB - 100

The numeral "1" indicates the first position on Power Panel, K. Box, etc., "2" the second position, etc.

When a numeral precedes the circuit marking and a letter follows, the circuit is a submain.

1 - FB - 100 A

The "A" indicates the first position, "B" the second position, etc.

A numeral preceding the circuit marking and a letter and a numeral following it indicate a branch or a sub-branch.

1 - FB - 100 A 1

The last numeral "1" indicates the first position, "2" the second position, etc.

When the number following the circuit marking is one hundred series (FB 100), the circuit can be assumed to be a lighting circuit of 120 volts; the figure "1" indicating the voltage. The remaining figures in the number will be the circuit number. There will be exceptions to this rule; for instance, a circuit with the number "165" or "326," and a few others. These will be located on the power print, for they are considered power circuits. Generally the figures "1" and "4" indicate a lighting voltage of 120, or a power voltage of 440, respectively.

2) Interior communication is called I.C.

3) Fire control is called F.C. circuits (guns)

4) Sound circuits

 
110
 
B. Procedure (continued)

5) Radio

6) Degaussing

j. Keep all large cables within the machinery spaces inboard of the cable rack. The remainder are to be installed in the way they will best fit the particular location.

k. Whenever possible, group power and light, I.C. and fire control, and radio.

2. CHECK ALL DETAILS ON MAIN WIREWAY PRINT SUCH AS CABLE MARKINGS AND THEIR INTERPRETATIONS, POWER, LIGHTING, FIRE CONTROL, I.C., AND RADIO.

a. Identify the different circuits, noting service they perform and where they will be found aboard a ship.

b. List in small notebook all I.C. and fire control circuits, cable data and stuffing tube hole data and any other information that may be helpful.

c. Study prints of various types of hangers, in order to visualize types of hangers used in different cable runs.

3. OBTAIN BLUEPRINTS COVERING ALL THE CIRCUITS AND LIST EACH CIRCUIT INDIVIDUALLY.

a. Start with the lighting circuit.

b. Locate the bulkheads in the section selected.

c. Begin with the forward bulkhead of the section and consider this as the source of the cables that enter the section.

Note: The source of the remaining cables will be at the point where above cables start. The place or point where the cables stop or leave the section will be the cable destination.

d. When listing the cables, show the number of the frame or bulkhead of the cable source and destination.

1) If the destination of the cables is a box, show the kind of box and its location.

2) If the destination is a tube area, show direction, whether up or down, and location of the area, frame number, port or starboard or C/L, whichever the case may be.

e. Omit the local runs when laying out main runs. They are to be put in later.

 
111
 
B. Procedure (continued)

f. List the cables in the following manner:

Cable Kind Circuit Source Destination
THFA3 Light 1-FB-10 2 BLK #159 BLK #183
THFA3 Light FB-10 2 BLK #159 Fr. 170-2K box C/L
THFA3 Power F-426 BLK #159 BLK #183
THFA3 Power F-326 BLK #159 BLK #183
THFA3 Power F-434 BLK #159 Fr. 170-up C/L
MHFA10 I.C. LD#C-LC25 BLK #159 Fr. 166-20 wire box
MHFA4 F.C. LD#G-GU5 BLK #159 Fr. 170-up C/L
MHFA19 Radio LD#R-RRB BLK #159 Fr. 180-Term. outlet

4. RE-ARRANGE THE ABOVE LISTING TO SUIT THE BRANCHING OFF OF THE CABLES.

a. Arrange the cables so that the through cables will extend to the outboard of the run. The next longest group of cables will follow the through cables.

b. Place each cable in its proper place with respect to the farthest aft.

Cables Listed to Suit Branching off of the Cables

Cable Kind Circuit Source Destination
THFA3 Light 1-FB-102 BLK 159 BLK 183
THFA3 Light FB-102 BLK 159 Fr. 170-2K box C/L
THFA3 Power F-426 BLK 159 BLK 183
THFA3 Power F-326 BLK 159 BLK 183
THFA3 Power F-434 BLK 159 Fr. 170-up C/L
MHFA10 I.C. LD C-LC25 BLK 159 Fr. 166-20 wire box
MHFA4 F.C. LD G-GU5 BLK 159 Fr. 170-up C/L
MHFA19 Radio LD R-RRB BLK 159 Fr. 180-Term. outlet

5. MAKE A COMPOSITE LIST OF THE CABLES IN TEE ABOVE ORDER.

a. Place the through cables, light, power, I.C., fire control, and radio to the outboard of the run, and place the remainder of the cables according to their branching-off point.

 
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B. Procedure (continued)

Composite Listing

Cable Kind Circuit Source Destination
THFA3 Light 1-FB-102 BLK 159 BLK 183
THFA3 Power F-426 BLK 159 BLK 183
THFA3 Power F-326 BLK 159 BLK 183
MHFA10 Radio LD R-RRB BLK 159 Fr. 180-Term. outlet
THFA3 Power F-434 BLK 159 Fr. 170-up C/L
THFA3 Light FB-102 BLK 159 Fr. 170-2K box C/L
MHFA4 F.C. LD G-GU5 BLK 159 Fr. 170-up C/L
MHFA10 I.C. LD C-LC25 BLK 159 Fr. 166-20 wire box

6. MAKE A COMPOSITE DRAWING OF THE ABOVE LISTING.

a. Obtain the following supplies:

Drawing board
T-square
Pencils
Paper
Triangle
Thumb tacks
Eraser

b. Make a drawing from the composite listing, showing bulkheads, boxes, tube areas, etc.

Note: Make sure to properly name each cable.

7. MAKE A DRAWING OF THE CABLRS IN RACK AT BULKHEADS.

a. Check main wireway to determine the type of hangers to use.

b. Look up the type on blueprint.

c. Study this type carefully, noting all details.

d. Make a sketch of this type of hanger and show cables in their proper location.

8. LAY OUT TUBE AREAS.

a. Secure shipfitters print covering the bulkhead to be considered.

b. Check carefully for size of area.

c. Check to see if the tubes are put directly into the bulkhead, or if a plate is cut out.

d. Check the kind of plate (lap of insert).

e. Check the kind of tubes to be used.

f. Refer to tube and hole chart to obtain proper sizes.

 
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B. Procedure (continued)

g. Lay out an area on paper the proper size.

h. Arrange tubes to fit into the area, keeping as near as possible the same location as that in which the cables lay in the rack.

i. Have no crosses at the area.

j. Do not allow cables to cross one another from one side to the other. However, cables may change tiers by either dropping down or going up.

k. When the area has been properly arranged to suit the cables, make a permanent layout of the area on heavy cardboard by drawing circles the actual size and spacing of the tubes and printing the cable and tube designation within each circle.

l. In laying out cables in the machinery spaces, keep all large cables to the inboard of the rack, and all through cables on the bottom tiers.

m. In the rest of the ship, keep through cables to outboard of rack and on bottom of tiers.

n. Where possible, arrange cable grouping as shown below:

Power
Light
)
) Together
)
I.C.
F.C.
)
) Together
)
Radio) Alone

o. Maintain polarity of single-conductor cables in order to avoid magnetic loops for all D.C. circuits. Negative and positive leads should never exceed 12-inch spacing; that is, D.C. circuits should be neutralized at all times.

p. Use multi-conductor cable when practicable; that is, duplex for single phase and triplex for 3 phase.

Note: When for special reasons it is necessary to run separate phase leads, the individual leads for the single or 3-phase circuits should be kept as close together as possible throughout their lengths. They should be twisted together not greater than 16 times the pitch diameter. Single-conductor cables carrying A.X. should not be grouped in the same hangers with cables carrying D.C.

 
114
 

II. CABLE TYPES AND USES

TYPE SLPP AND SLPA--These letters refer to single lighting and power plain, and single lighting and power armored. This cable ranges from 4,000 to 1,500,000 circular mils in approximate cross-sectional area. The smallest size, approximately 4,000 circular mils, consists of the single-stranded conductor, a layer of 40 per cent rubber, a layer of rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. Type SLPA has, in addition, an outside layer of basketweave armoring.

All cable of these two types with the exception of the smallest size is made differently. These cables consist of the stranded conductor, varnished cambric insulation, rubber-filled tape, reinforced rubber sheath, rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. The armored variety of these larger sizes has a basketweave metal armoring in place of the cotton braid.

Plain cable is to be used in turret columns and like installations where flexibility is important. The armored type, SLPA, is used in permanently installed lighting and power leads throughout the vessel where a single conductor is required.

TYPE SRLL--This is a single-conductor, low-tension, lead-sheathed cable for radio use only.

TYPE SRHLA--This is a single-conductor, low-tension, lead-sheathed cable for radio use only.

TYPE DLPP AND DLPA--This is a duplex cable for lighting and power use, and may be obtained either plain or armored. As in the case of the single conductor of this type, the smallest size is manufactured differently from the larger sizes, The smallest size, approximately 4,000 circular mils, consists of two conductors, each one of which has a layer of 40 per cent rubber insulation and a layer of rubber-filled tape. The largest size is 400,000 circular mils. (SLPA insulation is in the same sizes, from 4,000 circular mils to 1,600,000 circular mils.) These two conductors are twisted together. Dry jute filler is used to obtain circularity of cross section. The conductors are then covered with a layer of rubber-filled tape, a layer of 40 per cent rubber, another layer of rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. In the case of the armored variety, a basket-weave metal armoring is used instead of the cotton braid.

The larger sizes run from 9,000 to 60,000 circular mils approximate cross-sectional area. In these sizes, each conductor is covered with varnished cambric. The two conductors are then twisted together and filled with jute, as in the smallest size described above. The conductors are then covered with a double layer of varnished cambric tape half lapped, a layer of rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. In the armored variety, the cotton braid is replaced with basket-weave metal armoring.

 
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The plain variety of this cable shall only be used in special or approved installations. The armored variety is used throughout the vessel for permanently installed lighting and power leads where a duplex cable is required.

In general, duplex cable of approximately 60,000 circular mils or less is to be used in preference to two leads of the single cable. Referring to the table of limiting current capacities, note that the single cable is to be used for cable sizes larger than the 60,000 circular mil type.

TYPE DLB--This duplex, lighting, braided cable consists of two conductors, each covered with a layer of 40 per cent rubber and a layer of rubber-filled tape. The two conductors are then twisted together using dry jute as a filler. The next layer is a layer of rubber-filled tape followed by an outside covering of cotton braid. This cable should not be used for permanently installed lighting leads.

TYPE DRHLA--This duplex, high-tension, leaded and armored cable has a very high insulation resistance and is to be used only on high-tension circuits.

TYPE TRLL--This twin conductor, low-tension, lead-sheathed cable is for radio use only.

TYPE TRHLA--This triplex, high-tension, leaded and armored cable, like the duplex variety, has a very high insulation resistance and should be used only for radio work.

TYPES TLPP AND TLPA--This triplex cable is for lighting and power use. Each conductor is twisted together, using dry jute to maintain circularity of cross sections. The group of conductors is then covered with rubber-filled tape, a layer of 40 per cent rubber, a second layer of rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. The armored variety is covered with a basket-weave metal armoring in place of the cotton braid. The above description refers to the smallest size, approximately 4,000 circular mils, of the triplex cable. The larger sizes, from 9,000 to 60,000 circular mils, inclusive, are prepared as follows:

Each conductor is covered with varnished cambric. The three conductors are then twisted together, using dry jute as a filler. The group of conductors is then covered with a double layer of varnished cambric tape, half lapped. This is followed by a layer of rubber-filled tape, a rubber sheath, a layer of rubber-filled tape and a cotton braid. In the case of the armored variety a basket-weave metal armoring is used instead of the cotton braid.

The triplex plain cable is used for leads only in special or approved installations. The triplex armored variety is used for permanently installed lighting and power leads which require a three-conductor cable.

 
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TYPE FLB--This four-conductor braided cable is for lighting use. Each conductor is covered with a 40 per cent rubber insulation and a layer of rubber-filled tape. The four conductors are then twisted together, using dry jute filler. The group of conductors is then covered with a layer of rubber-filled tape and cotton braid. This braided cable is not to be used for permanently installed lighting leads.

TYPE FLP--This is a four-conductor plain cable for lighting use only. It is similar to Type FLB except that the group of conductors is covered with a layer of rubber-filled tape, a reinforced rubber sheath, a layer of rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. This cable shall be used for leads only in special or approved installations. The maximum current carrying capacity is 10 amperes.

TYPE FLA--This four-conductor armored cable is for lighting use only. It is similar to Type FLP except that a basket-weave metal armoring is used instead of the cotton braid. This cable shall be used for all permanently installed lighting leads throughout the vessel which require four conductors. The maximum current-carrying capacity of this type is 10 amperes.

TYPE FPC--This is a flame-proof cable. This cable consists of a single conductor covered with an asbestos layer and an asbestos braid which has been made flame proof by a special cement.

TYPES GICP AND GICA--This is a multiple-conductor cable for general interior communication use. The smallest size consists of two conductors. Each stranded conductor is covered with a cotton thread, a layer of 40 per cent rubber, and cotton braid. The two conductors are then twisted together, using dry jute as a filler. The group of conductors is then covered with rubber-filled tape, 40 per cent rubber insulation, rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. The armored variety of this cable is covered with a basket-weave metal armoring in place of the cotton braid.

The larger cable for interior communication use contains 4, 7, 10, 14, 19, 22, 26, 30, 37, and 40 conductors per cable. Each conductor is prepared in the same way as the conductors in the twin cable. The conductors are then twisted together in layers. The direction of lay for successive layers of conductors is alternated. One conductor in each layer is solid color: red, black, or green. The group of conductors is covered with rubber-filled tape, reinforced rubber sheath, rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. The armored variety of this cable is covered with a basket-weave metal armor instead of the cotton braid.

Type GICA cable is used for all permanently installed interior communication and fire control leads which operate at a pressure less than 600 volts. The plain variety of interior communication cable is for use in the center column of turrets where flexibility is most important and as leads to instruments mounted on guns where the cable is led through the center of the gun mount.

 
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TYPES TPTP AND TPTA--This twisted pair, plain and armored telephone cable, is for use where the circuit operates below 50 volts. Each conductor consists of a single untinned copper wire covered with enamel, silk, and cotton. Each pair of conductors is twisted together. The smaller size cable of this type has one pair of conductors; the next larger size has three pairs of conductors. These pairs are twisted together and then covered with a layer of varnished cambric. The next layer is rubber-filled tape, followed by 40 per cent rubber insulation, rubber-filled tape, and a cotton braid. In the armored variety a basket-weave metal armoring is used instead of the cotton braid. The next larger size of this type cable contains 5 pairs of conductors and the succeeding sizes contain 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, or 60 pairs of conductors. In all these larger sizes the several pairs are twisted together in layers. The direction of lay is alternated for successive layers. One conductor of one pair in each layer shall be marked with a solid color--red, black, or green. This group of conductors is then covered with a layer of varnished cambric and a layer of rubber-filled tape. The next layer is reinforced rubber sheath, followed by a layer of rubber-filled tape and a cotton braid. The armored variety is covered with a basket-weave metal armor in place of the cotton braid.

In general, Type TPTA cable is used for all permanently installed leads for the telephone system. Type TPTP cable is used in the center column of turrets where flexibility is important and as leads to instruments mounted on guns where the cable is led through the center of the gun mount.

TYPE TCP--This is a telephone cord, plain, with two or three conductors.

TYPE TCP-1--This is an extra flexible, ship's service, two-conductor cord for connecting transmitters and receivers to the reel. Each conductor consists of 12 very fine copper strands covered with silk and copper braid. One conductor has a green and the other an orange marker thread. They are twisted together with white cotton filler cord and covered with a flexible black cotton braid. TYPE TCP-2--This is a two-conductor cord for fire control telephone use. Each conductor consists of three wires of tinned steel or bronze twisted at the center of a group of nine wires of tinned copper. This conductor is covered with cotton thread, rubber insulation, and a red or black cotton braid. One red and one black conductor are then twisted together using jute as a filler. The group of conductors is then covered with a rubber insulation and a glazed black cotton braid. TYPE TCP-3--This is a three-conductor cord for fire control telephone use. This cord consists of three conductors similar to those described above in Type TCP-2. Each conductor is covered with cotton thread and a rubber insulation, followed by a cotton braid of red, black, or yellow. One conductor of each color is used to make the cable. After three colored conductors are twisted together, they are covered with a 40 per cent rubber insulation and a glazed cotton braid.

 
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TYPE TCS--This is a sheathed telephone cord and may be obtained with two or three conductors.

TYPE TCS-1--This is a two-conductor type. Each conductor consists of three wires of tinned steel or bronze about which are wrapped nine wires of tinned copper. This conductor is covered with cotton thread, rubber insulation, and a red or black cotton braid. One red and one black conductor are twisted together and covered with a rubber sheath.

TYPE TCS-2--This is similar to Type TCS-1 except that it consists of three conductors, colored red, black, and yellow. Types TCS-1 and TCS-2 telephone cord are used where highest flexibility and the smallest diameter of cord are not important.

TYPE PCP--This is a portable cord, plain, and may be obtained as a two-conductor, four-conductor, or five-conductor cord. There are three sizes of the two-conductor cord; namely, 1,400, 2,600, and 4,100 circular mils.

Type PCP cable is used for leads connecting outlets to electric fixtures of the semi-portable type, such as boom, steering, anchor, peak, blinker, and running lights; also for leads connecting outlets to such fixtures as fans, portable blowers, electric tools, and portable lighting units.

TYPE PCP-1--This is the 1,400 circular mil two-conductor cord. Each conductor consists of 14 copper wires twisted together and covered with cotton and rubber insulation. The pair of conductors are then twisted together and finally covered with a tough rubber sheath.

TYPE PCP-2--This is the 2,600 circular mil cord. It is similar to type PCP-1 except that it contains 26 copper wires instead of 14.

TYPE PCP-3--This is the 4,100 circular mil, two-conductor cord. It is similar to the other two conductor cords except that each conductor consists of 41 copper wires twisted together.

TYPE PCP-4--This is a four-conductor cord, of 1,400 circular mil cross section. Each conductor is prepared the same as the conductor of Type PCP-l. The four conductors are covered with different colored cotton braid and then twisted together. The group of conductors is covered with a tough rubber sheath.

TYPE PCP-5--This is the five-conductor cord and is also a 1,400 circular mil cord, but consists of five conductors. Otherwise it is similar to Type PCP-4.

TYPE GRC--This is a multiple-conductor cable for gyro repeater use, and may be obtained with 7, 10, or 12 conductors. Each conductor consists of 14 copper wires twisted together and covered with cotton thread, rubber insulation, and a cotton tape. The whole group is then covered with a tough rubber sheath.

 
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TYPE BW--This is bell wire and consists of a seven-wire conductor covered with cotton thread, and a rubber insulation, before being finally covered with a waterproof cotton braid.

Type BW cable is for use where high flexibility is not required, for instrument wiring, and for miscellaneous small wiring of switchboards and panels.

TYPE BC--This is known as bell cord. Each conductor consists of 26 copper wires twisted and covered with cotton thread followed by a rubber insulation. The conductor is next covered with a braid of silk, colored green. Both conductors are then twisted together to form the bell cord. Bell cord is used as a flexible lead connecting outlets to push buttons and such other applications as may be specifically approved by the bureau. If it is desired to use three conductors, Type BC-3 may be used. This is exactly the same as Type BC-2 except that three conductors are used instead of two.

TYPE IW--This ignition wire consists of a single conductor of 19 copper wires, covered with a rubber insulation and a braid which will resist oil, gasoline, water, ozone, and weather.

This cable shall be used exclusively for wiring internal combustion engines.

TYPES SHFA, DHFA, THFA--Conductors same as L.P. type.

Insulation as per copper conductor:
Felted asbestos
Varnished cambric
Felted asbestos
)
)
) Conductor
)
)
Felted asbestos
Special impervious sheath armor
)
) Cable
)

TYPES MHFA AND MHFP--These are the same as GICA and GICP, but insulation is the same as I.D. and THFA.

 
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III. CABLE TYPES WITH ABBREVIATIONS

Abbreviation

SICP Single instrument cable, plain
SLPP Single light and power, plain
SLPA Single light and power, armor
SRLL Single radio low tension, lead and armor
SRHLA Single radio high tension, lead and armor
SHFP(3) Single heat and flame resistant 3KV propulsion
SHFP(5) Single heat and flame resistant 5KV propulsion
SHFS Single heat and flame resistant SW bd. and panel wire
SHFW Single heat and flame resistant wire
SRIG Synthetic resin insulated glass braid
SRIB Synthetic resin insulated, braided
SFPP Single flame proof, plain
SFPA Single flame proof, armor
SFPS Single flame proof, switchboard wire
SHFA Single heat and flame resistant, armor
DHFP(3) Double heat and flame resistant 3KV propulsion
DHFP(5) Double heat and flame resistant 5KV propulsion
DCOP Double conductor oil resistant, portable
DLPP Duplex lighting and power, plain
DLPA Duplex lighting and power, armor
DLB Duplex lighting, braided
DRHLA Duplex radio high tension, lead and armor
DFPP Duplex flame proof, plain
DFPA Duplex flame proof, armor
DHFA Duplex heat and flame resistant, armor
THFP(3) Triple heat and flame resistant 3KV propulsion
THFP(5) Triple heat and flame resistant 5KV propulsion
TCOP Triple conductor oil resistant, portable
TTHFF Twisted pair telephone heat and flame resistant, flexible
TRLL Twin radio low tension, lead
TLPP Triplex light and power, plain
TLPA Triplex light and power, armor
TRHLA Triplex radio high tension, lead and armor
TPTF Twisted pair telephone, flexible
TFPP Triplex flame proof, plain
TFPA Triplex flame proof, armor
TSW Telephone switchboard wire
TPTA Twisted pair telephone, armor
TPTP Twisted pair telephone, plain
THFA Triplex heat and flame resistant, armor
TTHFA Twisted pair telephone heat and flame, armor
FCOP Four conductor oil resistant, portable
FLB Four conductor lighting, braided
FLP Four conductor lighting, plain
FLA Four conductor lighting, armor
FFPP Four conductor flame proof, plain
FFPA Four conductor flame proof, armor
FHFA Four conductor heat and flame resistant, armor
MCOS Multi conductor oil resistant, portable
 
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Abbreviation
MUFF Multi conductor heat and flame resistant, flexible
MFPP Multi conductor flame proof, plain
MFPA Multi conductor flame proof, armor
MHFA Multi conductor heat and flame resistant, armor
MCMB Multi conductor marker buoy
GICP General Interior Communication, plain
GICF General Interior Communication, flexible
GICA General Interior Communication, armor
BW Bell wire
BC Bell cord
VLS Volt meter leads sub
SCP Single conductor, portable
DCP Double conductor, portable
TCP Triple conductor, portable
FCP Four conductor, portable
MCP Multi conductor, portable
MCS Multi conductor, shielded
PCP Portable cord, plain
GRC Gyro repeater cable
325AB Single conductor sound cable, R.C.
325AD Twin conductor sound cable, armor
325 J Twin conductor sound cable, lead and armor
325 K Twin conductor sound cable, rubber cover
325 L Five conductor sound cable, rubber cover
325 M Five pair sound cable, lead and armor
325 N Four conductor sound cable, rubber cover
325 Z Twin conductor sound cable, rubber cover

Note: The prefix letter on all cables indicates the number of conductors in the cable except the "M" and "GIC" cables.

The suffix numeral on all cables except the "M" and "GIC" cables represents the size of the conductor in 1000 circular mils. On the "M" and "GIC" cables, the suffix numeral represents the number of conductors in that cable. The size of wire on all "M" and "GIC" cables is number 3 Navy or 3000 circular mils.

 
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IV. STANDARD CONDUCTORS BEFORE INSULATING

Nearest
A W G
NAVY standard size
designation copper
conductor
Number of strands Nominal strand diameter in inches Diameter over stranded conductor in inches Area of stranded conductor in cir. mils
22   3/5 1 .0250 642
23   1/2 21 .0050 .028 525
20 1 19 .0070 .036 950
20 1 1 .0320 1,024
20 1 7 .0126 .039 1 120
18 1-1/2 1 .0400 1,600
18 1-1/2 16 .0100 .049 1,616
18 1-1/2 41 .0063 .049 1,640
16 2-1/2 1 .0510 .051 2,601
16 2-1/2 26 .0100 .061 2,626
15 3 7 .0200 .061 2,828
15 3 19 .0126 .065 3,040
14 4 1 .0640 .064 4,110
14 4 7 .0250 .076 4,494
14 4 41 .0100 .077 4,141
13 5 19 .0159 .080 4,826
12 6 1 .0810 .081 6,530
12 6 19 .0179 .090 6,088
12 6 65 .0100 .097 6,565
11 8 1 .0910 .091 8,280
10 9 7 .0360 .108 9,030
10 9 90 .0100 .120 9,090
9 13 1 .1140 .114 13,100
9 14 7 .0450 .136 14,350
9 14 140 .0100 .145 14,140
7 21 1 .1440 .144 30,736
7 23 1 .0570 .171 22,820
7 23 226 .0100 .180 22,826
5 30 19 .0400 .202 30,780
5 30 304 .0100 .330 30,400
4 40 19 .0450 .226 38,950
4 42 209 .0140 .260 42,218
(19 x 11)
3 50 19 .0510 .254 49,020
2 60 37 .0400 .282 59,940
1 75 37 .0450 .317 75,850
0 100 61 .0400 .363 98,820
00 125 61 .0450 .045 125,050
000 150 61 .0510 .547 157,380
000 153 760 .0140 .500 153,520
(19 x 40)
0000 200 61 .0570 .514 198,860
250 61 .0640 .577 250,710
253 1254 .0140 .660 253,310
(19 x 66)
 
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Nearest
A W G
NAVY standard size
designation copper
conductor
Number of strands Nominal strand diameter in inches Diameter over stranded conductor in inches Area of stranded conductor in cir. mils
300 91 .0570 .628 296,660
400 127 .0570 .742 414,020
400 2,052 .0140 .825 400,500
500 127 .0640 .833 521,970
650 127 .0720 .936 657,860
672 3,330 .0140 .985 672,660
(37 x 90)
800 127 .0810 1.051 829,310
814 4,033 .0140 1.255 814,666
1000 127 .0910 1.187 1,046,000
1600 127 .1140 1.480 1,662,000
 
124
 

V. COLOR CODE FOR TTHFA

New Synthetic Insulation

1 White other wire Blue
2 White other wire Orange
3 White other wire Green
4 White other wire Brown
5 White other wire Slate
6 White other wire Black
7 White other wire Red
8 White other wire Yellow
9 White other wire Purple
10
to
17
)
) Blue is paired with 2 to 9
)
18
to
24
)
) Orange is paired with 3 to 9
)
25
to
30
)
) Green is paired with 4 to 9
)
31
to
35
)
) Brown is paired with 5 to 9
)
36
to
39
)
) Slate is paired with 6 to 9
)
40
to
43
)
) Black is paired with 7 to 9
)
 
125
 

VI. INSTALLATION NOTES FOR ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
Standard Naval Practice

1. All motor controllers, distribution panels, and similar apparatus (except switchboards and switchboard panels which have special installation requirements) shall be installed at a height so that either the bottoms of the enclosing cabinets shall be not less than five feet, or the top not more than seven feet above the deck.

2. All hand-operated appliances, including distribution boxes with switches, individual switches, receptacles with switches, push buttons, jack boxes, etc., shall be installed on bulkheads at a height of not more than six feet above the deck.

3. Connection boxes, feeder connection boxes, feeder distribution boxes, feeder junction boxes and distribution boxes without switches may be installed overhead, provided the deck height does not exceed nine feet, and the minimum-head room under the appliances is not less than seven feet.

4. All controllers, panels, and apparatus shall be so installed that they are completely accessible for operation repairs, renewal of fuses, testing, maintenance, etc.

5. All watertight and explosion-proof electric wiring equipment shall be fitted with standard terminal tubes for the entrance of cables. When the equipment has aluminum cases, the terminal tubes shall be aluminum. In installing aluminum tubes in aluminum boxes, the terminal tubes shall be threaded into the boxes until the shoulder of the tube touches the side of the box. The end of the threaded part of the tube shall be flush with the inside wall of the box. The aluminum thread of box and terminal tube shall be coated with an anti-seize compound of petrolatum and zinc dust.

6. The entrance of cables through the bottom of vertically installed non-watertight appliances shall be avoided where side or top entrance is practicable and involves no undue increase in wiring. Care shall be taken, however, that the saving in weight intended by the use of such non-watertight appliances is not offset by the installation of additional cable lengths to avoid bottom entrance to the cable for such appliances. Where cables do enter the top of non-watertight fittings, standard terminal tubes shall be used.

7. Cables shall be carried into the side of such appliances so that they are maintained to their full diameter at least flush with the inside surface of the box wall.

8. Cables entering watertight appliances shall use standard terminal tubes except that where such appliances are used in connection with a non-watertight installation, cable clamps shall be used, unless modified by note No. 6.

 
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9. All unused outlets in watertight junction boxes, distribution boxes, feeder distribution boxes, etc., shall be tapped and plugged. Standard Brass I.P.S. plugs shall be used in composition boxes and galvanized steel I.P.S. plugs in aluminum boxes.

10. The installation of lighting fixtures shall not be made until the general arrangement of all other fittings, furniture, etc., has been decided upon and they shall be in complete accordance with the final arrangement of structural material, fittings, furniture, etc., within the compartment. In cases where lighting units are installed to satisfy contemplated arrangement of structural material, fittings, furniture, etc., and such arrangement is later changed on the vessel, the location of lighting units shall be changed to suit. Fixtures shall be accessible and shall be so installed that illumination is not interfered with by ventilation ducts, pipes, cables or other overhead fittings and equipment.

11. In storeroom, issuing room, and commissary spaces, particular attention shall be given to the location of lighting units in order that these units will be in the center of aisle spaces and not on top of bins, fittings and equipment, etc., and that the maximum illumination valves may be obtained in the working spaces.

12. In crew and C.P.O. berthing spaces, lighting fixtures shall be located in the aisle between berths; however, particular attention shall be paid to the stowage of lifebelts.

13. In mess spaces, particular attention shall be given to the location of lighting fixtures so as to properly illuminate mess tables.

14. In general, all switches controlling lights shall be located near the access and shall be about four feet six inches above the deck, with the exception of the switches for blue light bulkhead lights which shall be nippled to the fixture.

15. Where switch and single receptacles or switch and double receptacles are fed from distribution boxes with switches, the switch in the distribution box shall be blanked. The switches shall also be blanked for feed to relay operated howlers, single phase indicators on control panels or for similar alarm units.

16. In connection with the installation of lighting fixtures in machinery spaces, fireroom, and other hot spaces, consideration should be given to the tightening of the supporting screws for the sockets in order to prevent the splitting of the insulation due to too much tension.

17. In congested areas and elsewhere if required, stuffing tubes shall be staggered on either side of bulkhead; that is, alternate tubes are to be located on each side of bulkhead to allow more space for welding.

 
127
 
18. Cable hangers shall be spaced a maximum of sixteen inches center to center, and cables passing through deck beams or stiffeners shall be supported at a distance not to exceed eight inches on both sides of the deck beam or stiffener.

19. All permanently installed cables shall be secured to decks and bulkheads by standard methods. Special attention shall be given to the support of heavy banks of cable. Where practicable and except where otherwise specified, cables shall be run on bulkheads in preference to overhead on the under side of deck.

20. Where cables pass through non-watertight bulkheads or beams of over 1/4 inch thickness, no stuffing tubes shall be used, but the holes therein shall be drilled slightly larger than the cable and the edges rounded off to prevent chafing of the leads. Where the non-watertight bulkheads or beams are 1/4 inch and under in thickness, standard or special bushings shall be used. On all non-watertight bulkheads where sharp bends occur in the cable immediately after passing through such holes, standard or special bushings shall be used.

21. In food handling or storage spaces, cable hangers shall be bracketed away from flat surfaces and the cable runs restricted to single layers, unless otherwise specifically approved, to enable spraying for insect control.

22. Main wireways and through cable runs shall be so arranged that the cable will not be disturbed by disassembly or removal of machinery.

23. Care should be exercised to avoid the grouping together cable of different voltage and phase relationship and different service application, power, interior communication, telephone, etc., in such a manner as to pile up electrical or magnetic stresses or interfere with the proper functioning of the electrical circuits involved.

24. a. If any other lead is practicable, electric cables shall not be led into or through the following spaces, nor in spaces adjacent thereto, which are ordinarily open to such spaces when powder is being handled:

1) Powder magazine and other spaces where powder is stored.

2) Powder handling rooms and gun chambers and other spaces where exposed powder is handled.

3) Warheads, depth charges, mine charges, and aerial bomb magazine and other T.N.T. magazines.

b. If cables are run through the above spaces, they shall in every case be of armored type and shall be of unbroken length within the space. If led into the above spaces, they shall be of unbroken length to the fixture at which they terminate.

 
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c. Cables which are led into or through the above spaces shall be run overhead where practicable, in which case they shall be strung in clips so spaced as to prevent droop.

d. Where it is necessary to run cables along or down a bulkhead, they shall be protected against mechanical injury, if required by inspector, by a non-watertight five-pound steel casing. The casing surrounds the electric cables in magazines and other spaces in which ammunition is handled. Suitable air space shall be provided between the above protective casing, bulkhead, or deck and the cable, with openings or holes in the casing as may be necessary to ventilate the air space itself. Adequate drainage will be provided for casing located on the floor.

25. Wherever circuit trunking cable runs are installed for two electrical systems, one of which is auxiliary or secondary to the other, or emergency for the other, the trunking of the cable shall be such that the two systems are maintained as widely separated in the vessel as is possible in order to reduce the likelihood of damage to both from the same causative agency. Where multiple stations are installed to provide secondary control, in case of damage to one or more station, the cable leading to each station shall be separated as much as possible throughout their entire length.

26. Cables which are installed where they will be subjected to mechanical injury in service shall be protected within such exposure zones by suitable metal casings.

27. Where required, the protection of leads passing through decks shall be in accordance with standard methods by means of conduits (kick pipes) forming a part of the stuffing tube. Such kick pipes shall be fourteen inches in height except in special cases where a deviation from the type is specifically approved. The height of all kick pipes installed in one group shall be uniform.

28. Where eight or more cables are installed through a deck other than a weather deck, a community riser shall be provided in lieu of kick pipes. On weather decks kick pipes shall be used exclusively unless otherwise specifically approved.

29. Where four or more cables are run through decks or bulkheads with insulation, the insulation shall be cut away and short stuffing tubes used. In installations of less than four cables, stuffing tubes of a length suitable to pass through the insulation shall be used.

30. The run and grouping of cables shall be such as to avoid inaccessible pockets of sufficient size to provide harborage for rats. Cables shall be hung away from structural members parallel to the cable run that would form pockets and partially conceal spaces so that top surfaces may be readily inspected and kept clear of nesting material. Where cables pass through trunks or ducts, either the clearances of the duct or trunk shall be kept to less than one-half inch or the ends of the duct or trunk

 
129
 
shall be protected by rat wire. In cases where structural or other conditions interfere with the above type of installation, special ways and means of accomplishing rat proofing shall be given a thorough study in order that the final layout shall be such that rat proofing requirements are accomplished insofar as practicable.

31. All cables on bulkheads in the following areas shall be mounted so as to provide a space approximately 3/8 inch between bulkheads and cable in order to allow condensation to run down bulkhead and not collect in back of cables:

a. Crew's washrooms

b. Officers' shower room

c. Engine room

d. Fire rooms

e. Underwater sound room

f. Steering geer room

g. Laundry

h. Galley

i. All bulkheads and areas exposed to weather

32. In connection with the installation of cables through bulkheads and decks, the cables should be arranged in such a manner that adequate inspection shall be provided between all cables in connection with the elimination of nesting material and rat harborage.

33. If any other lead is practicable, electric cables shall not be installed under such conditions or in such locations as may cause it to be subjected to excess heat. The following conditions and locations shall be considered as falling within this category:

a. Boiler rooms

b. Over, or in too close proximity to, turbine steam piping or other hot locations in engine room.

Note: Unless otherwise specifically approved in each individual case, electric cables shall not be located within the vicinity of super-heated steam piping or machinery. Such cables shall be kept as far as practicable from the hot surfaces and in no case closer than three feet.

c. Over, or in too close proximity to, resistors, rheostat, transformer or other heat-dissipating appliances of the electrical system.

 
130
 
34. If there is any practicable alternative, cable runs shall not be made over boilers or in the upper portion of boiler room, or in any other location where, under certain operating conditions, the cables may be blanketed with very hot air.

35. In general, and except where otherwise specifically approved, cable runs shall be made along bulkheads in the lower portion of boiler room so as to take advantage of ambient temperature conditions.

36. Horizontal runs shall be utilized to the greatest extent practicable in order to reduce the tendency of the cable lubricant or saturant to migrate.

37. Where such cable runs cannot be avoided, cable leads over or in too close proximity to turbine steam heater, steam piping, electric resistors, rheostats, etc., and other heater apparatus shall be provided with suitable heat insulating barriers.

38. In general and where it is practicable to avoid same, electric cables shall not be installed adjacent to fire mains, water and steam pipes and other apparatus or piping which may cause injury to the cable by leaks, flooding or drip. Where such proximity is unavoidable, the cable shall be provided with suitable drip-proof protection overhead or other suitable barrier against water.

39. All cables exposed to radio frequency fields, also all cables entering and within radio spaces (including portable cables to deck fixtures, bracket fan, etc.) shall be of the metal-armored type or metallicly shielded throughout their entire length, the shielding to be grounded.

40.

a. Where cables enter non-watertight or molded Phenolic fixtures and appliances which are exposed to radio frequency fields, grounding shall be accomplished by cleaning the armor of the cable at the point the securing clamp is fastened, and grounding the clamp to the ship's structure with 3/8" x 1/16" aluminum strap.

b. In the use of metallic fixtures and fittings fitted with terminal tubes, the armor of the cable will be grounded by inserting as the last ring a ring of flexible metallic packing.

c. In all cases the ground connection shall be painted immediately after installation.

41. In the handling of electric cable both prior to and during its installation aboard ship, care shall be taken to avoid abrasions, crushing by blows or by bending too sharply without aid of mandrel or other device, particularly where the cable is very cold. Also the contact of cables with water and/or lubricating oil or grease shall be carefully avoided. No damaged cables shall be installed and any cable damaged during or subsequent to its installation aboard ship shall be removed and replaced by satisfactory cable. The minimum safe bending temperatures are as follows:

 
131
 
a. 40° F. for cable Dia. up to 1-1/4"

b. 50° F. for cable Dia. larger than 1-1/4", but less than 2"

c. 55° F. for cable Dia. over 2"

42. Whenever electric cable is cut into lengths for the purpose of installation, all cut ends, whether on the lengths being installed or on the lengths remaining on reels or in coils, shall be sealed in a suitable manner so as to prevent the entrance of moisture into the interior of the cables via the cut ends. In this connection it cannot be too strongly emphasized that such cut ends are the most vulnerable portions of the cables and any failure to observe the necessary precautions at the proper time may result in the boxing up of moisture entailing subsequent serious hazard.

43. In the case of cable provided with a protective basket-weave metal armor, the ends of such armoring shall be secured in a suitable manner whenever the cable is cut into lengths to prevent the armor from loosening up and springing back from the cut end.

44. All cable entrances in non-watertight appliances shall be made tight against drip or vermin by the use of a suitable compound (Duxseal, Halowax aluminastic) applied to the joints between the cable and the box wall.

45. Solderless-type connectors shall be used for all flame and heat-resistant cable.

46. For solderless connectors, the cable end shall be prepared for the terminal connection by neatly turning back the insulation for the required distance, thoroughly cleaning the individual strands, and then twisting them tightly together before clamping the solderless connector.

47. All terminals for interior communication system shall be solderless type as far as practicable, except as noted below.

48. All terminals for sound powered telephone equipment shall be of the standard soldered type.

49. In connection with the use of soldered terminals, the terminal shall be tightly clamped over the prepared conductor so as to grip it solidly before soldering.

50. Cable insulation and its protective covering shall be intact close up to the terminal. Where the copper conductors have been exposed in making connections the insulation shall be renewed by carefully wrapping the conductor with an approved insulating tape, Phenolic or cord. The cable end and cable insulation shall be thoroughly saturated and sealed with insulating varnish approved for the purpose. The finished connection shall present a neat and workmanlike appearance. Leads within electrical fittings shall be bound by cord with loops separated by a distance depending on conductor size, and varnished (rubberoid-glyptal).

 
132
 
51. For all 3-phase 440-volt circuits where the leads are separated they shall be provided with additional insulation consisting of one layer of linen tape thoroughly painted with black insulating varnish. In the case of 440-volt circuits to push buttons, etc., no additional insulation shall be provided over the individual conductors. No additional insulation shall be provided for circuits less than 440 volts except as required by note listed under No. 50 above.

52. Where clamp fittings (Bureau Standard Drawing) are specified, such as used with STD junction boxes, etc., the cable ends shall be bared and the individual strands thoroughly cleaned and twisted together and then soldered to form a neat solid terminal for fitting under the clamp. In order to increase the size of the terminal thus formed in small conductors, the bared strands may be bent back on themselves before being twisted and soldered.

53. Where a connection is to be made under a screw head and the use of a standard terminal is not practicable, a loop or eye shall be formed on the cable end by baring the conductor for the required distance, thoroughly cleaning the wire strands, twisting them tightly together, bending them around a mandrel so as to form an eye of suitable size and dipping the whole eye in the solder so it will form a solid terminal integral with the cable. Graumets may be used on approval.

54. To obtain the greatest degree of compactness practicable, those types and sizes of cable having the smallest permissible radii shall be placed on the inner side of the cable group, allowing cable having larger bending radii to be placed on the outside of the group.

55. Where shorter bends are required for terminal entrances, standard angle type terminal tubes, either forty-five degree or ninety-degree type, shall be used.

56. In the case of horizontal bends of large radii, particularly in such location as might be subject to damage by personnel or by vibration, a suitable mechanical supporting member shall be employed and the cable securely attached thereto at frequent intervals.

57. Special care shall be taken to maintain proper phase relation of all wires from the switchboards to appliances, etc., that is, phase wires A, B, and C shall be similarly connected throughout their length for feeders, mains, submains, and branches.

58. In order to standardize connecting of phase wires to equipment, the following system shall be used on lighting and power cable (three wire) where color coding is used, black to be wire A; white to be wire B; and red to be wire C.

59. The bus arrangement and connection to switchboards or panels looking at the back of the switchboard or panel shall be A-B-C respectively from left to right, top to bottom, or front to back, the front being the bus nearest to the switchboard panel.

 
133
 
60. For uniformity in wiring installation, the wiring appliances and front connected panels shall be installed and connected in a manner so that phase rotation facing the appliance or front of the panel shall be A-B-C respectively from top to bottom, right to left, or front to back.

61. The terminals of rotating machines will be marked with phase designation so that when these terminals are connected to the source of supply in the same order; that is, A to A, B to B, and C to C, the rotation of the motor shall be clockwise facing the power end of the machine.

62. For counterclockwise rotation of the motor, phase wires A and B shall be interchanged.

63. No spliced connections shall be permitted in the electric plant installation.

64. All steel straps and hanger material except pads and welded studs shall be galvanized after forming. All bolts, nuts, screws, washers, etc., shall be cadium plated, or suitably painted.

65. All aluminum hangers, casings and supports shall be painted with one coat of zinc chromate primer and one coat of aluminum paint as soon as possible after forming, and a second coat shall be applied after assembly and installation on the ship.

66. All faying surfaces of aluminum alloys shall be painted with one coat of zinc chromate primer and allowed to dry, and the fittings separated from the bulkhead or deck by a canton flannel (for light work) or canvas gasket (for heavy work) soaked in zinc chromate iron oxide paint just before installing.

67. All cables shall be painted with one coat of aluminum paint, all painting being done after cables are pulled and before they are strapped down. The painting shall be accomplished by spraying.

68. All aluminum pipe shall be painted with one coat of zinc chromate primer and two coats of aluminum paint.

69. All aluminum castings are painted with one coat of zinc chromate primer and two coats of aluminum paint, and where the zinc chromate primer has been scratched or damaged due to installation, the fittings shall be retouched with zinc chromate primer before the additional coats of aluminum paint are applied.

70. Threads of aluminum pipe shall be coated with an anti-seize compound.

71. Great care shall be taken that electrical insulators are not painted, such as molded or pressed insulation of various forms, cable cleats, etc., which might introduce leakage. Care shall also be taken that gaskets, rubber packing or any jointing of watertight work are free from paint.

 
134
 
72. Canvas washers for aluminum stuffing tubes shall be soaked in linseed oil or Phenolic Resin varnish and painted with a thick coat of zinc white paste when in contact with steel decks or bulkheads, and shall be soaked in zinc chromate iron oxide paint when installed in contact with aluminum decks or bulkheads.

73. All cables shall be painted as per note No. 89, after which they may be painted to match their surroundings. If no other finishing coat is applied, an additional coat of aluminum paint shall be applied as a final finish.

74. All electrical fittings, fixtures, etc., except molded type (See note No. 77) shall be painted after installation to match their surroundings.

75. All emergency lighting fixtures shall be painted green, except those on molded insulation. Since the latter may not be painted they shall be marked as emergency lighting fixtures by painting a green ring on the structural deck or spring hanger support adjacent to the fixture, or by providing a suitable name plate marked "Emergency Lighting" on or adjacent to the fixture.

76. All ungalvanized steel work in back of cables or boxes shall be painted with one coat of aluminum paint in addition to the priming coat, before the installation of cable.

77. Fixtures of molded insulation shall not be painted other than as required by the following subnotes:

a. Holes drilled in fixtures or boxes of Phenolic material for the entrance of electric cables shall be painted with bakelite varnish immediately after drilling to prevent moisture absorption.

b. Flash edges present in molded electrical fittings shall be painted with bakelite varnish to prevent moisture absorption.

78. Name plates and tags shall be located in readily accessible positions where they can be read at all times without danger to personnel.

79. When a name plate is mounted on a panel or switchboard, it shall be placed in close proximity to the equipment to which it refers and generally either directly above or directly below it.

80.
a. After the drilling operation in the Electrical Shop, the Phenolic pieces shall be cleaned with carbon-tetrachloride and then refinished with a Glyptal or equivalent coating.

b. In all cases where practicable the Phenolic boxes, fixtures, etc., should be covered with some sort of paper jacket after installation to keep the outer surface of the pieces as clean as possible.

c. Upon arriving at the completion point of the compartment, the Phenolic pieces should be wiped with carbon-tetrachloride if considered necessary, and touched up with Glyptal or equivalent coating.

 
135
 
81. All cables shall be tagged at each point of connection and on both sides of a deck, bulkheads or other barrier. Where cables feed directly to current-consuming devices and do not pass through decks, bulkheads, or barriers, they shall be tagged once, which shall be at the point where they leave the source of supply; however, tags may be omitted from branch leads to outlets in the same compartment fed from boxes, having individual branch circuit name plates which have sufficient identification to trace the lead to the outlet.

82. Cables shall be tagged as close as practicable to the point where the terminals connect to the panels or piece of equipment.

83. Cable tags shall be marked with the feeder, main, submain, or branch circuit designation for lighting and power cables and with the circuit designation and cable number for interior communication and fire control system.

84. Name plates shall be fastened securely to such parts of machinery or equipment as ordinarily will not be renewed during their service life. The attachment shall be by means of screws, self-threading screws, or steel drive pins.

85. All electrical appliances in the nature of switches, control apparatus, etc., located in another compartment or at a distance from the unit controlled shall be clearly marked with a name plate showing the use and operation of same and the location and ship's designation of the unit controlled.

86. Where power and lighting leads run into a distribution panel the main lugs and buses shall be stamped with the circuit letter and number, and the phase designation. Suitable name plates shall be provided adjacent to the switch handles for all branch circuits on the panel itself, and on the outside of the panel box cover for feeders and panel designation. Terminal lugs shall be marked with the circuit letter and number, and also with the phase designation in the case of three-conductor cables.

87. The terminals on back of all switchboards shall be marked with the circuit letter and number. Where buses are provided, this marking may be stenciled on the bus.

88. The buses of switchboards need not be marked with the polarity or phase indication as this information will be self-evident from the location of the buses, except that' when a set of bus bars do not constitute a full three-phase supply (a single-phase tap) the buses shall then be marked.

89. All terminal lugs for cables on switchboards and distribution panels shall be marked with a phase marking, A, B, C, (for AC) or plus or minus (for DC).

90. Projecting bus structure in the rear of switchboard shall be protected by insulating material barriers, to prevent personnel from being thrown against live buses by movement of vessel.

 
136
 
91. In general, all voice tube outlets shall be installed five feet above the deck, except that mouthpiece set at an angle of forty-five degrees from the horizontal shall be installed fifty-seven inches above the deck.

92. All interior communication and fire control wire terminals shall be stamped with circuit markings and wire number as shown on the various elementary diagrams, so as to clearly identify the wire and its function in the circuit. In addition to the markings required above, all wire terminals for call Bell Systems (circuit A and E) shall have on the reverse side the number of the cable which contains the leads to which the terminal is marked as shown on the Isometric diagram of the system. This reverse marking shall be made only in the case of leads emanating from connection boxes or similar conditions, such as a single lead to a push button or bell where the cable number is evident.

93. Blown fuse indicators shall be provided for all fuses on fire control, inter communication, A.C.O. switchboards, all control circuits on main switchboards, for vital operation such as voltage regulators, circuit breakers, etc., and on all three-phase mains and submains on power and lighting circuits.

94. Care shall be exercised that all permanently installed motors other than bracket fans are thoroughly grounded.

95. Electrical fittings of aluminum alloy where mounted on steel decks and bulkheads, plates, hangers, etc., shall have between faying surfaces canvas washers soaked in raw linseed oil or Phenolic Resin varnish and painted with zinc white paste. Electrical fittings of molded Phenolic material when similarly mounted shall have between faying surfaces felt or duck washer impregnated with Phenolic Resin varnish.

Note: All the foregoing notes are standard Naval practice.

 
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APPENDIX

I. Symbols Used in Marine Electrical Blueprints

II. Color Codes Used in Marine Electrical Blueprints and Wiring


APPENDIX

I. Symbols used in marine electrical blueprints

Manual Starter with Speed Regulator
M-G Set
Motor (H.P. Rating)
Electrical Unit
Controler
Manual Control-Thermal Type Overload Protection
Series Field
Shunt Field
Master Switch

 
140
 

Start or Stop single button P.B. -Momementary contact with Ind. light
Start or Stop single button P.B. -Permenent Contact with Ind. Light
Start or Stop two button P.B. -Momementary contact with Ind. light
Start or Stop two button P.B. -Permenent contact with Ind. light
Thermostatic Switch
Pressure Switch
Vacuum Switch
Float Switch
Colored Ind. Light (Color Shown)
Blown Fuse Indicator
Fwd-Rev-Stop Three Button P.B. - Momentary Contact
Manually Operated Speed Regulator

 
141
 


Solenoid Brake
Rheostat
Resistor
Solenoid Valve
Storage Battery
Circuit Breaker
Fuse
Switch
Tumbler Type Switch
Start or Stop single contact button P.B.-Momentary contact or Spring Return Switch
Start or Stop single contact button P.B.-Permenant contact.
Start or Stop two contact button P.B.-Momentary contact or Spring Return Switch
Start or Stop two contact button P.B.-Permenant contact.

 
142
 


U.V.-Undervoltage
O.L. Overload P.U. 300 percent
SB Step Back Ward 140 Do 45 over 100, P.U. Anchor 290
SBR Step Back Relay P.U. Less Than 65 percent volts
LR Latch Relay D.O. 10 Sec.
SH.F.W. Shunt Field Weakening - Pick Up at Less than 65 percent volts
TR.TR1 Transfer - Pick Up at Less than 65 percent volts
F.W.R. Field Weakening - D.U. 28 percent - D.Q.- 20 F.L.A.
Accelerating Relays - 3 A.R. 1 Sec 5 A.R. 5 Sec, 4 A.R. 1 Sec 6.A.R 3 Sec.
Electric Tachometer Corp. Type-1C1 - Shaft Revolution Indicator and Counter with Lamps Bkhd.
Electric Tachometer Corp. Panel MFG. Typ 1C1
Electric Tachometer Corp.Transmitter and Counter Type TMI
10 Wire Conn. Box. Lovell Cat. 715
Choke Coil Elec. Tach. Corp. DR 1069-D-3
Rudder Angle Ind. Hench Cat 10-781
Rudder Angle Transmitter 10-785
Denotes Equipment Shown in Elimentary Diag.
- G.E.Co. Winch Sym.
- Series Coil
- Shunt Coil Z
- Normally Open Tip
- Normally Closed tip
- Normally Open Time Open
- Normally Close Time Closing

 
143
 

Table of symbols

 
144
 

Table of Symbols

 
145
 

Table of Symbols

 
146
 

Table of Symbols

 
147
 

Table of Symbols

 
148
 
II. Color codes used in marine electrical blueprints and wiring

Navy Type

Conductor No Base Color Tracer Color Tracer Color
1 Black
2 White
3 Red
4 Green
5 Orange
6 Blue
7 White Black
8 Red Black
9 Green Black
10 Orange Black
11 Blue Black
12 Black White
13 Red White
14 Green White
15 Blue White
16 Black Red
17 White Red
18 Orange Red
19 Blue Red
20 Red Green
21 Orange Green
22 Black White Red
23 White Black Red
24 Red Black White
25 Green Black White
26 Orange Black White
27 Blue Black White
28 Black Red Green
29 White Red Green
30 Red Black Green
31 Green Black Orange
32 Orange Black Green
33 Blue White Orange
34 Black White Orange
35 White Red Orange
36 Orange White Blue
37 White Red Blue
38 Brown
39 Brown Black
40 Brown White
41 Brown Red
42 Brown Green
43 Brown Orange
44 Brown Blue
 
149
 

Telephone Twisted Pair Code #22

Twisted pair color code: When furnished as twisted pair, the following color code shall apply:

Pair Number One Wire Other Wire
1 Blue White
2 Orange White
3 Green White
4 Brown White
5 Slate White
6 Blue/white White
7 Blue/orange White
8 Blue/green White
9 Blue/brown White
10 Blue/slate White
11 Orange/white White
12 Orange/green White
13 Orange/brown White
14 Orange/slate White
15 Green/white White
16 Green/brown White
17 Green/slate White
18 Brown/white White
19 Brown/slate White
20 Slate/white White
21-40 First twenty repeated Red
41-60 First twenty repeated Black
61-80 First twenty repeated Red/white
81-100 First twenty repeated Black/white
101-120 First twenty repeated Red/black
121-140 First twenty repeated Black/orange
141-160 First twenty repeated Black/green
161-180 First twenty repeated Black/brown
181-200 First twenty repeated Black/slate

Capacitance. The capacitance of a 50-foot twisted-pair sample, after first drying for 4 hours at 30° C., and then followed by exposure for 24 hours to 30° C. and 90 per cent relative humidity, shall not exceed 2500 micro-microfarads at 1000 cycles per second. When the capacitance measurements are made, the sample shall be removed from the coil frame used for humidification purposes, and tested either in a straight length or in such position as to avoid errors due to too close proximity of any one portion of the test specimen to any other portion (such as might be introduced were adjacent loops to touch in a closely coiled specimen).

 
150
 

Telephone Twisted Pair Code #22 (continued)

Insulation resistance. The direct current insulation resistance (between conductor) of a 50-foot twisted-pair sample, after exposure for 24 hours to conditions of 30° C. (86° F.) and 90 percent relative humidity, shall be not less than 1,000 megohms. The insulation resistance measurements shall be made immediately following the capacitance measurements.

#22 Single Wire Telephone Code. Single conductors shall be furnished in the following colors, as required:

White Blue/white Green/slate
Blue Blue/orange Brown/white
Orange Blue/green Brown/slate
Green Blue/brown Slate/white
Brown Blue/slate Red/white
Slate Orange/white Black/white
Red Orange/green Red/black
Black Orange/brown Black/orange
Orange/slate Black/green
Green white Black/brown
Green/brown Black/slate
 
151
 
Foldout 1 - Outboard Profile - Typical Allweld Cargo Vessel.

Foldout 2 - Inboard Profile Single Screw Cargo Motor Ship.

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