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SECTION 5

NUMBERING CABLES AND CONDUCTORS
 

1. INTRODUCTION.

All ships cables are identified by metal tags that show the source, relative importance and classification of each cable. Permanently installed ship's cables are tagged as close as practicable to each point of connection, on both sides of decks, bulkheads, and other barriers. The length of cable between cable tags should not exceed 50 feet. Non-vital cables less than 50 feet long and located wholly within the same compartment, so that they may be easily traced, need not be tagged.

2. IDENTIFICATION OF CABLES.

C - I. C. leads
F - Ship's service lighting feeders and general power feeders.
FB - Battle power feeders.
G - Fire control circuits.
R - Electronic (radio, radar, and sonar) circuits.
XFE - Emergency lighting and emergency power feeders.

Feeders that supply power to electronic equipment are identified as is specified for power and lighting circuits, up to the last distribution point preceding the electronic equipment. Then the electronic designations are used on cables from this last distribution point to the electronic loads. Power cables between units of electronic equipment have electronic designations.

  3. ELECTRONIC CABLE DESIGNATIONS.

Electronic cables are marked as follows:

EXAMPLE: R-RB3

R indicates electronics.
RB indicates an entertainment receiver circuit.
3 indicates cable number 3 of the entertainment receiver circuit.

EXAMPLE: 2R-ES7

2 indicates the second surface search radar circuit on the vessel.
R indicates electronics.
ES indicates a surface search radar circuit.
7 indicates cable number 7 of the surface search radar. Note that where 2 or more systems with identical circuit letters are installed, the cable designation is preceded by a number.

3. COLOR BANDING.

All vital and semi-vital electronic cables, except branch and sub-branch circuits, have identification tags colored as follows:

Radio, Radar, Sonar

Vital - Red
Semi-Vital - Yellow
Non-vital - Gray
 
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Cables having power system designations are color-banded red when supplying vital I.C. and F.C. circuits and yellow when supplying semi-vital circuits.

5. DEFINITIONS.

VITAL CABLES. -Those, which if cut in action, would disable apparatus absolutely necessary to the fighting effectiveness of the ship.

SEMI-VITAL CABLES. -Those which, if cut in action, would disable apparatus that contributes to the fighting effectiveness of the ship but is not absolutely necessary.

NON-VITAL CABLES. - Those which furnish power to apparatus whose loss would not seriously impair the fighting effectiveness of the ship.

6. CLASSIFICATION.

The following classification lists vital, semi-vital and non-vital electronic, I. C. and F.C. circuits with their circuit letter designations. (See Table 9-3a, 9-3b and 9-3c.

For power circuits, the classifications are shown on the feeder lists. For I. C. and F. C. circuits; the classifications are indicated by a note on the respective isometric wiring diagrams.

  7. TAGS.

The tags for marking cable are made of colored soft steel, zinc, or aluminum tape.

Figure 9-16 shows dimensions, shape and installation.

8. CONDUCTOR MARKING.

All active conductors of electronic cables are marked by stamping, or by use of branded synthetic sleeving, where terminals are too small to be stamped. Terminals to be inter-connected should be marked identically.

In addition to its own identifying marker. each conductor is marked with the cable designation of which it is a part. This is done by placing a synthetic sleeve or fiber tag, having the cable designation on the conductor, next to the point where the connection is made within a connection box. Spare conductors of each cable are grouped and identified with their cable designations.

Color coding for individual conductors is shown in Tables 9-4 and 9-5.

 
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CIRCUIT LETTERS VITAL (RED) CIRCUIT LETTERS NON-VITAL (GRAY)
Radio Communication R -RA Radio Transmitting and Receiving Antenna Systems (includes R. F. extension system) R-RB Radio Entertained Receiver Circuits (includes both audio and radio frequency distribution circuits)
IR -RC Transmitter remote control system circuits (also combined transmitter and receiver control circuits)
2R-RC Receiver remote control system circuits
3R-RC Teletype circuits
R-RR Cables between units of a receiving equipment
R-RT Cables between units of a transmitting equipment
Countermeasures R-CC Communication countermeasures systems
(R-C) R-CR Radar countermeasures systems
R-CS Sonar countermeasures systems

TABLE 9-3a
ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

 
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CIRCUIT LETTERS VITAL (RED) CIRCUIT LETTERS NON-VITAL (GRAY)
Beacons R-BA Aircraft Beacon Systems
(R-B) R-BC Radio Beacon Systems
R-BR Radar Beacon Systems
R-BS Sonar Beacon Systems
R-BN Nancy Beacon Systems
Sonar
(R-S)
R-SA Azimuth Echo-Ranging-listening systems R-SE Depth Charge Direction indicators and range estimators
R-SD Depth Determining Sonar Systems R-SM Sonar Monitoring Circuits
R-SK Scanning Sonar Systems R-SP Attack Aid and Auxiliary Systems
R-SL Sonar Listening Systems R-SR Remote Indicator Systems
R-SO Bathythermograph Systems R-SU Underwater Object Locator Systems
R-SQ Combination Depth (Azimuth Sonar Systems)
R-SS Sounding (Fathometer) Systems
Search R-SB Underwater Telephone Systems
Radar System R-EA Air Search Radar Circuits
(R-E) R-EC CCA System Circuits
R-EF Fighter Director Radar Circuits
R-ER Radar Repeater Circuits
R-ES Surface Search Radar Circuits
R-EW AEW System Circuits
R-EZ Zenith Search Radar Cts.

TABLE 9-3b
ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

 
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CIRCUIT LETTERS VITAL (RED) CIRCUIT LETTERS NON-VITAL (GRAY)
Fire Control Radar R-FB Guided Missile Fire Control Radar
Systems R-FG Heavy Machine Gun Battery Fire Control Radar Circuits
(R-F) R-FM Main Battery Fire Control Radar Circuits (6" Guns and Larger)
R-FS Double Purpose Battery Fire Control Radar Circuits
IFF R-IA Circuits of IFF Equipment Operating in conjunction with Air Search Radar Systems
(R-I) R-IC Circuits of Integrated IFF System
R-ID Circuits of IFF Equipment Operating in conjunction with Fighter Director Radar Systems
R-IF Circuits of IFF Equipment Operating in conjunction with Radar Repeater Systems
R -IR Circuits of IFF Equipment Operating in conjunction with Radar Repeater System
R-IS Circuits of IFF Equipment operating in conjunction with surface Search Radar Systems
R-IT IFF Transponder Circuits

TABLE 9-3c
ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS

 
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VITAL CIRCUITS
(Light Blue)
G General alarm and chemical attack system
GA Torpedo control systems
GE and GEP Main battery control systems
GH and GHP Anti-aircraft control systems
GM Machine gun control systems
GJ and GSP Secondary battery control systems
GT Captain's target designation system
JA Primary battle telephone system
LC Gyro compass system
1LG, 2LG, 3LG and 4LG Gyro stabilizer motor generators
5LG Angle gyro system
1MC to 5MC
11MC to 17MC
General and battle announcing systems (where circuit G is incorporated in MC system)
SEMI-VITAL (Green)
EP Telephone and voice tube call bell system (protected calls)
IEC and 2EC Lubricating oil low pressure alarm systems
K Shaft revolution indicator system
L Steering telegraph system
 
NON-VITAL (Green) Cont'd.
1MB and 2MB Engine order telegraph systems
1MC to 6MC General and battle announcing systems where circuit G is not incorporated in MC systems
21 MC and Similar Systems Intercommunicating type announcing system
N Rudder angle indicator system
1PA to 5PA Auxiliary gun firing systems
PR Plotting room ready light system
QB Shell hoist latch indicator system
QC Powder hoist interlock system
R Ready light system
RA Intra turret emergency alarm system
RE Turret power elevating indicator system
RT Turret power training indicator system
1U to 5U Cease firing signal systems
IVB to 5VB Solar signal systems
XJ Supplementary telephone system
XGE Auxiliary main battery control
XJA Auxiliary battle telephone system
XL Auxiliary steering telegraph system
X1MB and X2MB Auxiliary engine order telegraph system
XN Auxiliary rudder angle indicator system
Y Underwater log system

TABLE 9-3d
INTERIOR COMMUNICATION AND FIRE CONTROL SYSTEMS

 
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Cable tags

FIGURE 9-16
TYPICAL CABLE TAGS

 
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COLOR IDENTIFICATIONS

Power System Cable Type Phase or Polarity Color or Code
3 ph. a.c. 3 cond. A
B
C
Black
White
Red
2 cond. AB A = Black
B = White
BC B = White
C = Black
AC A = Black
C = White
3 ph. d.c. 3 cond. +
±
-
Black
White
Red
2 cond. + and ± + Black
+ White
± and - ± White
- Black
+ and - + Black
- White
2-wire d.c. 2 cond. +
-
Black
White

Note 1. - The conductor to be used as the ground conductor, in cables where this is required, in any system, shall be the red conductor in 3-conductor cables and the green conductor in 4-conductor cables.

Note 2. - The ±, or neutral, polarity, when it exists, shall always be identified by the white conductor. This white conductor shall always be connected to the screw shell of lighting unit sockets to reduce to a minimum the shock hazard to personnel.

 
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COLOR CODE USED IN MARINE ELECTRICAL
I. C. and F. C. CABLES NAVY TYPE
Wire No. Base Color Tracer Color Tracer Color
1 Black
2 White
3 Red
4 Green
5 Orange
6 Blue
7 White Black
8 Red Black
9 Green Black
10 Orange Black
11 Blue Black
12 Black White
13 Red White
14 Green White
15 Blue White
16 Black Red
17 White Red
18 Orange Red
19 Blue Red
20 Red Green
21 Orange Green
22 Black White
23 White Black Red
24 Red Black White
25 Green Black White
26 Orange Black White
27 Blue Black White
28 Black Red Green
29 White Red Green
30 Red Black Green
31 Green Black Orange
32 Orange Black Green
33 Blue White Orange
34 Black White Orange
35 White Red Orange
36 Orange White Blue
37 White Red Blue
38 Brown
39 Brown Black
40 Brown White
41 Brown Red
42 Brown Green
43 Brown Orange
44 Brown Blue

TABLE 9-5
NAVY STANDARD COLOR CODE FOR CONDUCTORS

 
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SECTION 6

PREPARING FOR INSTALLATION
 

1. INTRODUCTION.

The cable for a piece of equipment has been installed in the wireways and is run to the equipment. The job now is to tie it into the equipment. Assume that the cable is to enter the equipment through a stuffing tube. The first consideration is the proper length of cable; it should be made somewhat longer than just enough to reach the connection point.

Form the cable run from the last cable strap to the equipment by hand, allowing for a clean sweep and enough slack at the stuffing tube. This last allowance is for the conductor run inside the equipment; here, good judgment must be used. Determine whether the conductor goes directly to its connection or whether it forms a laced cable and breaks off. Determine the longest conductor run in the laced cable, and add approximately 2 1/2 times this length to the length already determined up to the stuffing tube. This safety factor covers mistakes in attaching lugs or allows for re-routing. It is desirable to have a surplus so as to avoid cable renewals in the event of repairs. In applications where trouble may be anticipated, as in outside submarine wiring, allow approximately four feet additional slack in the cable run to avoid cable renewals, especially where the cable run is long. The cable length is now known and cut. The next step is to remove the armor.

  2. REMOVING THE ARMOR.

Form the cable as it is to be run into the stuffing tube and carefully estimate where the cable should come through the tube. Mark this position with a piece of friction tape. (Figure 9-17). The tape serves to seize the armor to prevent unraveling and holds down the armor while cutting; in addition, it serves a marker.

The actual cutting of the armor may be done with diagonal cutters or with armor strippers. Strippers, when available, are capable of doing a neat, fast job (See tool section), although care must be used in working knife blade adjustments on these tools. Most installation men use diagonal cutters. The quality of the work done with diagonal cutters depends, to a great extent, upon experience; an in-experienced man may easily cut through insulation and spoil a cable.

Method of cutting armor is as follows:

The cut may be taken either just in front of the tape marker or within it. By cutting just in front of the marker, the worker can closely watch his cut and avoid cutting insulation. The frayed edges of the armor can then be trimmed away. When cutting within the tape marker, the tape serves to hold the frayed edges down, but care must be used to avoid cutting the insulation. The armor is cut around the circumference of the cable (Figure 9-18).

 
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When the length of armor to be removed is not too great, it may be worked off without further cutting, but in some cases the armor must be cut lengthwise   for easy removal. The important thing to remember in cutting the armor is to avoid cutting the insulation, since this may let the frayed armor edges penetrate the cable and cause grounding.
 
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Drawing of cable before stripping armor.

FIGURE 9-17
REMOVING ARMOR FROM CABLE

 
9-51
 

Using cross cut snips to cut armor.

FIGURE 9-18
REMOVING ARMOR FROM CABLE

 
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3. STRIPPING INSULATION.

After the armor has been removed, start to remove the insulation at a distance of approximately 1/2 inch from where the armor terminates (Figure 9-19).

The following procedure is recommended in stripping the insulation:

First, if one end of the cable is not secured, place the end in a vise or have another man hold the cable. Put a bend in the cable and carefully ring the insulation (Figure 9-20) taking care to cut only the insulating jacket and not into the insulation of individual conductors. With the knife blade at an angle, start cutting a strip lengthwise, approximately 1/2 inch wide and long enough to allow side cutters a grip on the insulation (Figure

  9-21 and 9-22). Pull down on the cut with the side cutters. This will form a 1/2 inch strip, and after stripping approximately 4 inches, the remainder of the strip can usually be removed by hand (Figure 9-23).. It is an easy matter to peel off the remaining insulating jacket and to trim off the filler and threads of insulation with a pair of scissors or diagonal cutters.

The Jones cable stripper may be used to perform all of these operations very efficiently. Detailed instructions on the use of this stripper are included in chapter 3 - Hand Tools. The Huff cable stripper (See Chapter 3) can be used only on lengthwise cuts.

 
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Cable with armor off showing 1/2inch min of insulation.

FIGURE 9-19
REMOVING INSULATION FROM CABLE

 
9-54
 

Using a pocket knife to cut the insulation.

FIGURE 9-20
REMOVING INSULATION FROM CABLE

 
9-55
 

Using a pocket knife to remove insulation.

FIGURE 9-21
REMOVING INSULATION FROM CABLE

 
9-56
 

Using lineman pliers to pull back insulation.

FIGURE 9-22
REMOVING INSULATION FROM CABLE

 
9-57
 

Pulling a strip of insulation back.

FIGURE 9-23
REMOVING INSULATION FROM CABLE

 
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